The Life, Work and Tragic End of William Arthur Squire (1867-1908)

Front Cover of “Ritual, myth, and customs of the Australian Aborigines : a short study in comparative ethnology” by W. A. Squire (1896) (Courtesy of the National Library of Australia)

“Ritual, myth, and customs of the Australian Aborigines : a short study in comparative ethnology” by W. A. Squire (1896) (17.3MB PDF File)

The Life, Work and Tragic End of William Arthur Squire (1867-1908)
By Gionni Di Gravio

On a Wednesday afternoon, the 22 January 1908, around 4:30pm, Thomas Grant made a gruesome discovery whilst walking across the Australian Agricultural Company’s paddock in the vicinity of Lake Road, near the Bar, Merewether Beach. He discovered the body of a man lying face down in the sand;

It was that of the body of a middle-aged man lying on the sand, with a small revolver tightly gripped in the right hand and a bullet wound disclosed the cause of death, which had apparently taken place some hours previously. The body is that of a well-dressed man, in good circumstances, of about 40 years of age, with dark hair, mingled with grey. He was about 5ft. 7in. in height, and of medium build, clean shaven, with only a few teeth remaining in the upper jaw. He was wearing a dark, hard hat, and lace-up boots. Among the articles found on the deceased was a card-case, bearing the initials “W.A.S.” also letters from relatives in Africa. Portions of the linen bore the name of W. A. Squire, which is believed to establish the deceased’s identity. The matter has been reported to the District Coroner. A pencilled note was found in a pocket, which reads as follows:- “I cannot write to Rita: this will break her heart. I ask Will to instruct her and strengthen her faith in the Christian religion. I killed myself. In Natal I cannot face my innocent wife and children. Mother, Nar, Rita, Viva, all forget my evil. Remember only my good.” On the reverse side were the words “Forgive me all, Will.” The name on one of the letters and handkerchiefs was W.A. Squire. Deceased’s mother apparently lives in America for a letter was found from his mother, Box 783, Lisbon, Col. Co., Ohio., U.S.A., dated October, 29, 1907. – 1908 ‘OUR NEWCASTLE LETTER.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 23 January, p. 2. , viewed 22 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124438584

The man was William Arthur Squire (1867-1908), author of Ritual, myth, and customs of the Australian Aborigines : a short study in comparative ethnology published in 1896, and printed at the “Mercury” Office, West Maitland and member of the Maitland Scientific Society.

Squire was a member of the Maitland Scientific Society. As member of the committee, and Vice President of the Society, he organised a number of public lectures and wrote essays, mainly upon the themes of Aboriginal myth and ceremonial practice.

One lecture that he was unable to attend (as he had contracted typhoid and was recovering at the time) was that of Henry O’Sullivan White (son of surveyor George Boyle White).  O’Sullivan White delivered his memories of the Aboriginal Paddy Tighe, and the Aboriginal names of the fixed stars and planets during his recollections from the years 1848-1849-1850 before the Maitland Scientific Society on Monday, 19th August 1895 at the Maitland Technological Museum (currently part of the Maitland Art Gallery).

It was during our researches into the current whereabouts of White’s lost record of Paddy Tighe’s Aboriginal star names that the name “W. A. Squire” came to our attention, as a person of interest with regards to knowledge of local Aboriginal culture. Unable to locate a copy of H. O’Sullivan White’s missing notes on Aboriginal Astronomy, and noticing that Squires articles on the same topic began appearing in the Maitland Mercury the following year, I had naively hoped that Henry had given William his material to write up officially. But after a careful and methodical study of all the Aboriginal names for stars and planets in Squire’s work we came to the conclusion that all of Squire’s references came from already published contemporary sources, and not that of White and Paddy.

However, the more I read about Squire’s life through a search news articles on TROVE, the more I learned and understood what a remarkable intellect he was, the more sad it was to see such an educated and thoughtful person meet such a lonely and tragic end on Merewether Beach.

So, who was W. A. Squire? William Arthur Squire was born in April 1867 in Biggleswade, Bedfordshire. Not much is known of his early years in England, but frontispiece of his Ritual, myth, and customs of the Australian Aborigines : a short study in comparative ethnology included a portion from “The Grave of the Last Native King of Wallerawang,” a poem “suggested by a picture” that had been published a month earlier in Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier. He was 13 when this engraving, and its inspired poem, were published, and so suggests he may have had an interest in Australian Aboriginal peoples since his early youth, an interest which he would explore for the rest of his relatively short life.

 

The Grave of the Last Native King of Wallerawang. Poem inspired by the engraving. Ref: 1880 ‘The Grave of the Last Native King of Wallerawang.’, Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 – 1881), 20 November, p. 3. , viewed 18 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64973914

 

Burial of the Native King, at Wallerawang, illustration. Ref: 1880 ‘Burial Place of a Native King.’, Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 – 1881), 30 October, p. 2

 

Burial of the Native King, at Wallerawang, illustration. Ref: 1880 ‘Burial Place of a Native King.’, Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 – 1881), 30 October, p. 2. , viewed 18 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64973853 and illustration is here: 1880, Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 – 1881), 30 October, p. 5. , viewed 18 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page5406211

 

He arrived in Sydney on the 22 July 1886 at the age of 19, and immediately became involved in the local dramatic scene. On the 21 November 1887 he joined (or more likely formed) a theatrical group known as “The Strollers” at St Leonards:

At a meeting at St. Leonards last week a number of gentlemen interested in amateur theatricals and musical entertainments decided to inaugurate a club to be known as “The Strollers.” The meeting was fairly successful. Mr. M McMahon was elected patron and the following officers were appointed: — Mr. M. McBurney, president; Mr. C. S. Ormiston and Mr. W. P. Moore, vice-presidents : Mr. M. Percy Thiels, secretary ; Mr. W. H. Patterson, treasurer; Mr. Alfred Hawley, musical director; Mr. W. A. Squire, stage manager ; and Messrs. F. Thiels, J. B. Johnson, H. W. Butler and M. Crowley, committee. The initial performance will be given towards the end of next month. – 1887 ‘AMUSEMENTS.’, The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), 21 November, p. 5. , viewed 23 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article236761678

He performed at a variety of dramatic  productions and performances from 1887-1889. He began his Maitland connection through drama and sport; on the 17 April 1890, when he attended a meeting at the Sheather’s Royal Hotel, to discuss the establishment of a Philharmonic Society at West Maitland. He also played against the Maitland Rugby team, in his Sydney Pirates. He didn’t rate a mention, so he might not have been as good a rugby player, as he was a dramatic performer. The Philharmonic Society was established and on June 11 1891 he performed at its inaugural Girl High School Grand concert as a principal vocalist baritone.

On the 5 August 1891, he married Annie Turnbull, second daughter of William Turnbull, Esq., of Newcastle. The marriage took place at the residence of the bride’s father, by the Rev. Chas. Whyte. He was listed as still living in St Leonards, Sydney at the time. (Please note: The published family notice records William Turnbull as the father of the bride. But subsequent reports of the death of John Bewick Turnbull in 1906 list his daughter as Annie Squire, wife of William Arthur Squire). The latter newspaper report appears have confused the father of Annie, i.e. William Budd Turnbull (who later died in 1905) with his son, John Bewick Turnbull.

Sometime around 1891-1892 William Squire and his wife moved to West Maitland, where their first daughter Margaret Elizabeth Squire (1892-1979) was born. They resided at West Maitland until at least 1896, as their residence on the 29 January 1896 is listed as “West Maitland”.

On April 1 1895 he delivered his lengthy paper to the Maitland Scientific Society entitled Custom Myth Ritual and Symbolism. This was to become his greater work Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines. In late May 1895 he contracted typhoid and spent the rest of 1895 recovering from it. He also missed attending Henry O’Sullivan White’s presentation “Recollections of the Aborigines of New South Wales in the years 1848-1849-1850,” that was read before the Maitland Scientific Society on the 20 August 1895. See: https://hunterlivinghistories.com/2018/01/25/paddy-tighe/

From February to May 1896, a series of articles under the title of Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines By W. A. Squire was published in twelve installments. He continued to present papers along Aboriginal cultural themes, and published his Ritual, Myth, and Customs articles as a complete work. At the May 4 1896 meeting of Maitland Scientific Society (that was poorly attended) Mr. W.A. Squire delivered two short papers “A sketch of the historical development of art”, and another “The cave paintings and rock carvings of the Australian aborigines,” where he stated that,  little more than a year ago (i.e., 1895) he had visited one of the caves in the Wollombi district where there was a large painting evidently depicting marriage by capture, and gave a description of it. The Newcastle Herald reported that he described Aboriginal art is the “bedrock” of our Modern Art.

In July he compiled and published of list of Aboriginal Place Names, very similar to the kind of work that the Canon Carlos Stretch would later  undertake in the 1930s.

From at least August 1896, he was working on a new operetta, entitled “The New Arcadia,” for which he conceived the story and wrote the libretto to which Mr. G. F. King, A.R.C.O. set to music. It was performed on the 15 September 1896, in the Town Hall, West Maitland, to rave reviews, and successfully raised funds to build a library for the Girls’ High School.

In January 1897 he relocated to Natal, South Africa, perhaps to join his father in law, who was managing mining sites across the province. He became a principal in the firm Squire, Mitchell and Co., Australian provision merchants, and formed an Australasian Cricket Club. He also acted as a kind of ambassador, enabling local companies, such as the Pender Bros access to international markets for their honey products, by entering them in the Durban and Coast Agricultural annual show for which they won first prize and a silver medal inscribed with the words: “Durban and Coast Society Agriculture and Industry” with a wreath of native flowers enclosing the inscription –  “Pender Brothers, for Australian Beehives, first prize, 1897.” From 1899 Squire became editor for The Natal Bulletin, and the following year a Boer war correspondent for a number of Northern Newspapers. These articles were transmitted through the Maitland Mercury and Newcastle Herald that kept him in frequent touch with his friends in Maitland. He never forgot his humour, or home sickness, writing from Pietermaritzburg, on August 20th 1900:

“I am at present acting as city representative of the “Natal Mercury” at this place, where I have opened an office, and am well pleased with the result. However, I have had nearly four years of this country now, and, like all Australians, am beginning to turn my eyes towards the land of the great drought and small bandicoot. I am pleased to say that I went through the campaign as far as Standerton without turning a hair. I had many close escapes from shells and other material, also a very hard time on the Drachenberg without tents, but with a good supply of ice. The experience built up my constitution. I keep closely in touch with Newcastle’s affairs, and hope you will not have trouble of any kind in your coal trade.” Ref: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136235045

John Bewick Turnbull, who’s family were all living in Maritzburg, passed away in 1906. The news report appears to confuse him as being the father of Annie, and therefore the father in law of William Squire. In actuality John Bewick Turnbull was his brother in law.

In 1907, his second daughter, Viva Bewick Squire, was born, and named in honour of his late brother in law. He returned to Australia in late 1907, without them, as his wife and children were in England, probably visiting family relatives. They did return to Australia, following William’s untimely death.

The reasons for his taking his own life are unknown. The suicide note found on him provides some clues to his mental anguish at the time:

“I cannot write to Rita” (meaning his daughter). “This will break her heart. I ask Will (Arnott) to Instruct her and strengthen her further in Christian religion. I killed myself. In Natal I cannot face my innocent wife and children. Mother, Nan, Rita, and Viva, all, forgive all my evil ; remember only my good. Forgive me all. — Will.”

Perhaps he was suffering from what we now understand to be post traumatic stress syndrome due to war? Maybe a personal crisis?  His teenage daughter Rita, was around 15 or 16 years of age, why does she get a special mention? He asks “Will” who the Sunday Times identifies as “William Arnott,” the son of the famous biscuit manufacturer, and Newcastle Methodist preacher, to instruct and strengthen her in the Christian religion, maybe because he fears what the shock of what he has done will do to her. (A tribute to William Arnott (1866-1947) was published in the Methodist on the 26 July 1947 here: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article155619145) We will never know why he took his own life, but it is a shame that such a person, died alone and in such distress.

At his farewell at the Maitland Town Hall, on Thursday evening 21 January 1897, after he had received his thirteen sovereigns, illuminated address created by artist Mr William Tracey, and parting words from his colleagues on the Maitland Scientific Society, “deeply affected”  he said:

there was much he would like to say, but he was afraid there was very little opportunity for it. “There were times,” he said, “when the lips will speak more than the heart will endorse, but there are other times when the lips will not utter what the heart would express. With me, my desire to speak is lesser in degree than my emotion at the cause which calls for my reply to the kindest yet most painful words it has ever been my fortune or mischance to hear. Kind, because they wish me every benefit my endeavours can procure, and even more; painful because they are words of parting. Do not think gentlemen that any regret you may feel does not find its echo in my heart – the regret and pain I feel is ten times yours: you are losing one friend. I am losing many. I have more friends in this town than I anticipate ever making again in the same length of time. I arrived in Maitland a perfect stranger, acquainted with no one bearing one letter of introduction, and that from my late friend Leslie Hughes to his family, and to-day I leave town without one person wishing me ill-will (Applause.) Of this fact I am as proud as Caesar when upon the Lupercal he was offered a kindly crown. ‘Kind Hearts are more than coronets,’ and few upon a critical occasion required them more and few had more kind hearts and soothing hands, watchful eyes and gently words at their command. As I leave all with the deepest regret it would be ill-taste for me to individualise. I see around me old and new friends, and the new have not taken the place of the old. For your kindness, for your good wishes, for your disinterested efforts of me and mine, I return you a wealth of thanks by no means commensurate with the kindnesses you have bestowed.” In conclusion he said that he left Maitland with the deepest regret, and though it had not been very kind to him in the way of floods, in the way of heats he would remember Maitland and Maitland people all his life. He thanked them for their hearty farewells, and said from the bottom of his heart, “Thank you, gentlemen, and good-bye.” (Applause). – 1897 ‘Farewell Addresses to Messrs. Squire and Hill.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 23 January, p. 2. , viewed 22 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123770515

If Maitland does seek to establish a new Museum, please make sure that they make a space for William Squire there. He loved Maitland, and its people so much. I hope that I have made his spirit a little happier knowing he, and his story has been restored back to Maitland.

William Squire (1867-1908) & Annie Turnbull (1867-1934) had two daughters:

  1. Margaret Elizabeth Squire (1892-1979) m. Harry Irving Burrows  in 1912 in Sydney. They had 3 kids – William (b. after January 1918), Douglas Squire Irving (b. 1915)  & Margaret (b. 1913).
  2. Viva Bewick Squire (1907-2000) – possibly born overseas. She m. Neville Percy Breden (1904-1976) and they had 2 kids – Elizabeth and Ian. Neville was a medical practitioner and a colonel in the army. This couple did a lot of travelling. This biographical information was kindly located by Lyn Keily)

[August 2018 Update]

William Arthur Squire appears to have been laid to rest, without a tombstone, or inscription, within the area of the Turnbull Family plot at Sandgate Cemetery, Newcastle. His mortal remains appear to have been laid within the boundary of the Turnbull Family plot, but there appears to be no surviving inscription dedicated to him extant on the East facing side of the tombstone, which is mostly illegible unless one views it from an angle against a reflection, and then only partially legible at best.

The West facing side bears an inscription to both Margaret, wife of William, and William Budd Turnbull, Squire’s father in law, who passed away in 1905, and was Manager of the A.A. Company. Since William Budd Turnbull’s sons Paul and Ralph Turnbull, had the task of organising William Arthur Squire’s funeral, in the absence of his wife and family that were unable to return in time, they interred Squire within the Turnbull Family plot.

West facing side of Turnbull Family Plot and Tombstone (Plot contains the remains of William Arthur Squire) at Sandgate Cemetery. (Photographed 19 August 2018 Gionni Di Gravio)

 

Closeup of West Facing Side of Turnbull Family Tombstone at Sandgate Cemetery. (Photographed 19 August 2018 Gionni Di Gravio)

The west facing side of the tombstone reads:

[IN MEMORIAM]

MARGARET

BELOVED WIFE OF
WILLIAM TURNBULL
DIED DEC. 4TH 1884
AGED 33 YEARS

ALSO

WILLIAM BUDD TURNBULL
LATE MANAGER A.A.Co.
DIED OCTOBER 22ND 1905
AGED 79 YEARS

THY WILL BE DONE

 

East Facing Side of Turnbull Family Plot and Tombstone (Containing the mortal remains of William Arthur Squire) at Sandgate Cemetery. (Photograhed 19 August 2018 Gionni Di Gravio)

The East facing side of the tombstone is mostly illegible, we did attempt to photograph it from a variety of angles to capture the reflection in the inscription. We have been unable to find any reference to William Arthur Squire on the tombstone itself.

Location Code: ANGLICAN No. 1
02
ANGLICAN No. 1-02-94
SGC-ANG1-02-601-0094
Deceased: Gladys V Turnbull
William A Squire
Cemetery: Sandgate Cemetery
Co-Ordinates: Longitude: 151.707125 Latitude: -32.870810

 

Gionni Di Gravio
June 2018

 

SLIDES OF PRESENTATION TO MAITLAND REGIONAL MUSEUM FUNDRAISING DINNER
DELIVERED BY GIONNI DI GRAVIO 22 JUNE 2018

 

Timeline of the Life of William Arthur Squire (1867-1908)
Compiled (with Transcriptions) by Gionni Di Gravio

 

1867. William Arthur Squire was born in April 1867 in Biggleswade, Bedfordshire.

 

1880, October 30. Burial of the Native King, at Wallerawang, illustration. Ref: 1880 ‘Burial Place of a Native King.’, Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 – 1881), 30 October, p. 2. , viewed 18 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64973853 and  illustration is here: 1880, Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 – 1881), 30 October, p. 5. , viewed 18 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page5406211

 

1880, November 20. The Grave of the Last Native King of Wallerawang. Poem inspired by the engraving. Ref: 1880 ‘The Grave of the Last Native King of Wallerawang.’, Illustrated Sydney News and New South Wales Agriculturalist and Grazier (NSW : 1872 – 1881), 20 November, p. 3. , viewed 18 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64973914

 

1886. Arrived in Sydney on the 22 July 1886 at the age of 19.

 

1887, November 21, was part of a theatrical group known as “The Strollers” at St Leonards: At a meeting at St. Leonards last week a number of gentlemen interested in amateur theatricals and musical entertainments decided to inaugurate a club to be known as “The Strollers.” The meeting was fairly successful. Mr. M McMahon was elected patron and the following officers were appointed: — Mr. M. McBurney, president; Mr. C. S. Ormiston and Mr. W. P. Moore, vice-presidents : Mr. M. Percy Thiels, secretary ; Mr. W. H. Patterson, treasurer; Mr. Alfred Hawley, musical director; Mr. W. A. Squire, stage manager ; and Messrs. F. Thiels, J. B. Johnson, H. W. Butler and M. Crowley, committee. The initial performance will be given towards the end of next month. – 1887 ‘AMUSEMENTS.’, The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), 21 November, p. 5. , viewed 23 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article236761678

 

1888, June 30. The St Leonards B.C. rad race from tram terminus North Shore, along Military Road to Buena Vista and back to the starting place, a distance of eight miles 300 yards. ; W.A. Squires 1 min 5sec, 3; Ref: 1888 ‘NOTES BY “CYCLOS.”‘, Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 – 1907), 30 June, p. 41. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71099261

 

1888, September 19. St Leonard’s Literary and Debating Society performs at St Leonard Town Hall. Mr W.A. Squire told audience about the sad fate of McNulty’s Willygoat. Ref: 1888 ‘THEATRICAL AND MUSICAL.’, The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), 21 September, p. 7. (FIRST EDITION), viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228401804

 

1889, June 20. Sydney High School Concert. Mr W.A. Squire arranged and managed the dramatic performance part of the concert. “Mr W.A. Squire, who gave a characteristic study, as given by Mr. Lincoln, the humourist, a short time ago in Sydney. The drama entitled “to Paris and back for 5 pounds” was exceedingly well played.” Ref: 1889 ‘AMUSEMENTS.’, The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), 21 June, p. 8. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13741817

 

1889, June 20. Sydney High School Concert. Ref: 1889 ‘AMUSEMENTS.’, The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), 21 June, p. 6. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article236010074

 

1889, June 26. Balmain Lyceum Amateur Comedy Club at the School of Arts. W.A. Squire steps in at last minute to help performance reading from a book. Ref: 1889 ‘Dramatic Entertainment.’, Balmain Observer and Western Suburbs Advertiser (NSW : 1884 – 1907), 29 June, p. 5. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132309161

 

1889, October 5. St. Leonards Bicycle Club. W.A Squires is one of the competitors. Ref: 1889 ‘St. Leonards Bicycle Club.’, The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 – 1912), 5 October, p. 776. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article162067534

 

1889, December 18. Sydney High School Dramatic Club entertainment in the School of Arts. W.A. Squire gave a capital rendition of “The Wreck of the Steamship Puffin” which received an encore. Ref: 1889 ‘SYDNEY HIGH SCHOOL DRAMATIC CLUB.’, The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), 19 December, p. 10. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28275852

 

1890, April 17. W.A. Squire attended a meeting at the Sheather’s Royal Hotel to establish a Philharmonic Society at West Maitland. Ref: 1890 ‘Proposed Maitland Philharmonic Society.’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 19 April, p. 4. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18985441

 

1890, May 7. W.A Squire elected onto committee of newly formed Philhamonic Society at Masonic Hall Ref: 1890 ‘PUBLIC WORKS COMMITTEE.’, The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), 9 May, p. 7. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230604828  and 1890 ‘Maitland Philharmonic Society.’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 10 May, p. 7. (Second Sheet to the Maitland Mercury), viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18982821

 

1890, Nov 5. Maitland Philharmonic Society. First Grand Concert. Town Hall. W.A. Squire performed the song “London Bridge” (Molloy) Ref: 1890 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 4 November, p. 1. , viewed 25 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18982721 and 1890 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 1 November, p. 5. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18988936

 

1890, Nov 6. Maitland Philharmonic Society. Grand Concert. Mechanics’ Institute East Maitland. W.A. Squire with G. Kedwell performed in character sketch introducing songs. Ref: 1890 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 1 November, p. 2. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18988954

 

1891, May 14. Maitland Philharmonic Society. First Annual Meeting. 1891 ‘Maitland Philharmonic Society.’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 16 May, p. 6. (Second sheet to the Maitland Mercury), viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18990871

 

1891, May 25. W.A Squire to play Football – Albion Sports game on side of the Pirates. They play Maitland. Ref: 1891 ‘LOCAL NEWS.’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 23 May, p. 4. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18990191

 

1891, May 28. Football. Maitland Rugby v. Sydney Pirates. W.A. Squire played on the side of the Pirates. Ref: 1891 ‘Football.’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 28 May, p. 6. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18984032

 

1891, June 11. Girls’ High School. Grand Concert. School of Arts, West Maitland. Ad. Featuring W.A. Squire performing as one of principal vocalists as Baritone singing “Little Red Ridinghood.” And the song “The Old Sexton.” (Russell) Ref: 1891 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 6 June, p. 2. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18994953

 

1891, August 5, On the 5 August 1891, he married Annie Turnbull, second daughter of William Turnbull, Esq., of Newcastle. The marriage took place at the residence of the bride’s father, by the Rev. Chas. Whyte. He is listed as still living in St Leonards, Sydney at the time.

 

1891, November 26. Girls’ High School. Second Concert. School of Arts, West Maitland. Ad. Featuring W.A. Squire recitation of :The Wreck of the S.S. Puffin” (F. Anstey) Ref: 1891 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 21 November, p. 1. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19003479  See the review here: 1891 ‘LOCAL NEWS.’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 28 November, p. 4. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19003773

 

1891-1892 Sometime around 1891-1892 he and his wife moved to West Maitland, where their first daughter Margaret Elizabeth Squire (1892-1979) was born.

 

1892, February 12. Outdoor Concert at the Benevolent Asylum. Comic speech and song performed by W.A. Squire. Ref: 1892 ‘LOCAL NEWS.’, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW : 1843 – 1893), 16 February, p. 5. , viewed 25 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19006650

 

1894, May 8. Two paintings by Mrs W.A. Squire exhibited two paintings at “The Lakes of Killarney” Stall at St John’s Fancy Fair held at the Maitland Town Hall on Monday 7 May 1894. They were “Ross Castle” and “The Meeting of the Waters.” Ref: 1894 ‘St. John’s Fancy Fair.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 8 May, p. 2. , viewed 13 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124723680

 

1895, March 12. Threlkeld first mentioned death bone. 1895 ‘THE ABORIGINAL DEATH BONE.’, The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 – 1933), 12 March, p. 6. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3598419

 

1895, April 1. First instalment of W. A. Squire’s Custom Myth Ritual and Symbolism read to Maitland Scientific Society. Ref: 1895 ‘Maitland Scientific Society.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 2 April, p. 4. , viewed 13 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121316318

 

1895, May 10. W. A Squire of West Maitland performs comical number as he recites “The Wreck of the steamer Puffin.” At the Y.M.C.A. Fair. Ref: 1895 ‘THE Y.M.C.A. FAIR.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 10 May, p. 6. , viewed 24 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133223117

 

1895, July 1. The Illness of Mr. W. A. Squire.— The many friends of Mr. W. A. Squire will be pleased to learn that he has so far recovered from his late serious illness, as to give hope to his medical attendant that he will be entirely out of danger in the course of a few days should present favourable symptoms continue. It will be remembered that Mr. Squire became ill on the 26th May from typhoid, and at a critical juncture he also developed inflammation of the lungs and pericarditis, so that for a time his life was despaired of. However, with careful nursing by a trained nurse from Sydney, and the skilful attention of Dr. Liddell, we are pleased to hear that there is now every prospect of his immediate recovery. Ref: 1895 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 1 July, p. 2. , viewed 13 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121317786

 

1895, July 5. MR. W. A SQUIRE. During the last six weeks Mr. W. A. Squire, of West Maitland, has been lying dangerously ill from the effects of typhoid. The patient is now out of danger, however, and will, it is hoped, be convalescent within the next few days. Ref: 1895 ‘MR. W. A. SQUIRE.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 5 July, p. 8. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133229822

 

1895, August 20. H’O’Sullivan White “Recollections of the Aborigines of New South Wales in the years 1848-1849-1850.” Read before the Maitland Scientific Society. Ref: 1895 ‘Maitland Scientific Society.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 20 August, p. 4. , viewed 13 Jun 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article121321499

 

1896, January 29. Listed as living in “West Maitland”.

 

1896, February 24. Meeting of the Maitland Scientific Society. Mr J. Miller delivers paper on “The Customs of the aborigines on the border of New South Wales and Queensland” experiences of many years amongst the aboriginal people of the Barwon River district. Mr Squire delivered the vote of thanks. Discussions re cannibalism. President announced that the paper for the next night would be contributed by Mr W.A. Squire entitled “The historical development of art, with some notes on the aborigines.” Ref: 1896 ‘Maitland Scientific Society.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 25 February, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123932540 The Newcastle Herald states the paper is entitled “The historical development of art, with some notes on aboriginal cave paintings.” Ref: 1896 ‘SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 25 February, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article137439626

 

1896, February 29. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] 1. – The BORA CEREMONY Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 29 February, p. 11. , viewed 14 Jun 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132402147

 

1896, March 7. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 7 March, p. 6. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132404214

 

1896, March 14. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 14 March, p. 12. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132406687

 

1896, March 18. [Advertisement] EASTER ENCAMPMENT— RECEPTION OF 4th INFANTRY REGIMENT. A MEETING of the MEMBERS of the LANCERS, B and D COMPANIES INFANTRY and RESIDENTS of MAITLAND DISTRICT will be held in the COMMITTEE ROOM, SCHOOL OF ARTS, WEST MAITLAND, on FRIDAY EVENING NEXT, 20th inst., at Eight o’clock, for the purpose of arranging a suitable reception to Colonel Stokes and his command on their arrival at West Maitland in His  Worship the Mayor (Henry Crothers, Esq., J.P.) will preside. W.A. Squire Hon. Sec.  990 Ref: 1896 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 18 March, p. 5. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123930089

 

1896, March 20. The Easter Encampment. Ref: 1896 ‘The Easter Encampment.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 21 March, p. 2. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123934511

 

1896, March 21. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 21 March, p. 14. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132404290

 

1896, March 28. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] THE GRAVE. Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Ab origines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 28 March, p. 10. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132401405

 

1896, April 4. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] THE ASTRONOMY AND STAR-MYTHS OF THE ABORIGINES. Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 4 April, p. 13. , viewed 14 Jun 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132405499

 

1896, April 11. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] THE ASTRONOMY AND STAR-MYTHS OF THE ABORIGINES. Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 11 April, p. 6. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132402770

 

1896, April 18. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] THE ASTRONOMY AND STAR-MYTHS OF THE ABORIGINES. Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 18 April, p. 12. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132400466

 

1896, April 25. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] RELIGION, SUPERSTITIONS, AND TRADITIONS. Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 25 April, p. 11. , viewed 14 Jun 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132403647

 

1896, May 2. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] III. RELIGION, SUPERSTITIONS, AND TRADITIONS. Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 2 May, p. 13. , viewed 14 Jun 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132397878

 

1896, May 4. [Public Notice] Maitland Scientific Society Meeting Business: Paper by Mr. W.A. Squire on “Historical Development of Art, with Some Notes on Aboriginal Cave Paintings.” Ref: 1896 ‘Advertising’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 2 May, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136255687

 

1896, May 4. Meeting of Maitland Scientific Society (poorly attended) Paper by Mr. W.A. Squire on “Historical Development of Art, with Some Notes on Aboriginal Cave Paintings.” Delivered.  “The principal business of the committee was then proceeded with, the reading by the Vice-president, Mr. Squire, of papers prepared by him. Historical Development of Art, and Notes on Aboriginal Cave Paintings. He said he had in fact two papers. In one he had sketched the development of art from the earliest times and the second was a kind of side issue from it, as the aborigines’ art was the bed rock of our modern art. The first paper dealt in a general manner with the development of artistic design, sculpture, and architecture from its most primitive stages to the present time, and traced the course of art from the primitive races through Indian, Persian, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, and Gothic periods down to the present time. The different influences which each of those art-periods had upon the artistic methods was dwelt upon and shown. In illustration of the rest of the paper, Mr. Squire had prepared a diagram showing the pedigree of the various races and the development of art and culture through them. The diagram was divided into different eras. In the era of primitive man, there were no traces of art. Coming down to the beginning of the formation of language and the origin of nations from 100,000 to 10,000 B.C., the times of huts and caves, they had savage art shown in tree circles and scratches on wood. The succeeding nations were depicted,— the Vedas, with their expressions of the artistic in flint and wood weapons, carvings, and stone circles; religious expressions of art of the Manu, Buddha, Chrishna; through Persia, Egypt, Hebrew, &c.,  shown in giant monoliths, massive structures of stone, rock temples, bronze and iron implements ; the marble age with the classical temples, and perfect forms of statuary of Greece; through the Roman Early Christian as shown in the churches and cathedrals; down to the age of modern art in which all materials were used.  — In the second paper, the writer pointed out that the only means of life of the aborigines about Port Jackson, Cowan Creek, the Hawkesbury River, and Wollombi Brook was particularly favourable for the purposes of art. Evidences of the same endeavours to express ideas were shown, however in various parts of Australia, The large numbers of the caves in the places first mentioned lent themselves to the preservation of the unwritten history the tribes. He described how the carvings and paintings had been performed, and the sense of humour shown in several figures. The difficulty of understanding the meaning of the paintings, and whether they were the production of the modem race of aboriginals or of a previous race were dwelt upon. It was most likely they were the production of a race now passed away, as the present aborigines did not know the meaning of them, and in the opinion of the writer nothing definite would ever be known of the meaning of the crude work in the caves and on the rocks.

A conversational discussion ensued upon the reading of the last paper. In the course of which Mr. Squire stated that in one of the caves in the Wollombi district visited by him little more than twelve months ago, there was a largo painting evidently depicting marriage by capture, and gave a description of it. On the motion of Mr. J. E. Carter, seconded by Mr. Tipper, and supported by Mr. Butterworth, a vote of thanks was passed to Mr. Squire for his excellent papers and the trouble he had been to in preparing them…” Ref: 1896 ‘The Maitland Scientific Society.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 5 May, p. 4. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123922448

 

Another report of the same meeting from the Newcastle Morning Herald: MAITLAND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY.

The usual bi-monthly meeting of the Maitland Scientific Society was held in the Technological Museum last evening, the vice-president, Mr. W. ASquires, being in the chair. There was only a fair attendance of members. After some preliminary business had been attended to, Mr. W. A. Squiresproceeded to read two short- papers, the one treating of “The cave paintings and rock carvings of the Australian aborigines,” the other being “A sketch of the historical development of art” In dealing with the cave paintings and rock carvings of the Australian aborigines, the paper stated that the natural condition of the country or taurai of the Kurragai tribe of aborigines about Port Jackson, Cowan Creek, the Hawkesbury River, and WoIlombi Brook, was particularly favourable for the purposes of art, the Kurragai  having all the leisure to humour his fancy or pourtray a God. However, artistic efforts were not confined to the taurai of the K Kurragai as different explorers had observed paintings elsewhere Sir George Grey, Mr. Gosse, and Mr. H Y Brown saw them in West Australia; King, Flinders, and Cunningham, in the far North, on Clark and Chasm Islands and Cape Flinders; Bonwick, atRyletone; Howitt, in the Barrier Ranges; but in the Hawkesbury sandstone ranges of the Wollombi there were hundreds of caves whose walls illustrated pages to the unwritten history of the tribe. The design of the paintings and carvings, are not beautiful, a racial expression pervading the entire groops of pictures presented, end the mysterious red, yellow, or white hand-stencilled or impressed. The sense of humour is evident in many of the pictures, men being represented like Bardolphian frogs, geometrical individuals with triangular heads, and other ludicrous figures. The figures of Baimai, the rude embodiment of the aboriginal god, is never ludicrous, but with uplifted arms and stony expressionless face, ever the same throughout the entire series unattended by minor gods, cherubim seraphim, or saints. The paintings or drawings are generally executed in black (cinders), red (raddle), or white or yellow (clay) on the back walls, and roof of rock shelters or gibber gunyahs, in most cases in such a position as will admit of the sun shining into them during the greater part of the day. The hand, sometimes the closed fist or the whole arm, was placed upon the surface of the rook, and, then, either by blowing from his mouth or applying by other means, the pigment of white, black, or attached yellow in a dry or wet condition. In addition to the hands, other objects–boomerangs, stone axes, spears, and even feet – are represented by the stencilling process. The paper went on to inquire whether the paintings and carvings wore the work of the historical aborigines, or the vestiges of tribes long since passed away. In conclusion, the paper declared that the paintings were imitative, and the outcome of untutored tastes and crude ideas – the awakening artistic consciousness of the savage trying to express itself for some vague purpose.  Mr Squires believes that nothing definitely will ever be known regarding the explanation of what the aborigines meant by their crude work in the caves and on rocks. The second paper, “A sketch of the historical development of Art,” was very interesting, and was, accompanied by a very fine diagram which illustrated the growth of art from the earliest ages. In dealing with each subject Mr Squires showed that he had his subject matter well in hand, and the gentlemen present were awarded an intellectual treat.

On the motion of Mr. CARTER, supported by Mr. E. TIPPER, Mr. Squires was accorded a hearty vote of thanks. Ref: 1896 ‘MAITLAND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 5 May, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136261592

 

1896, May 4. At a meeting this afternoon of the general committee of the H.R.A. and H. Association “Messrs. W. Allison, W. A. Squire, and H. A. Young, the judges in the fine art section at the late show, wrote stating that there had been a deplorable absence of art at the show. Copies of inartistic prints and oleographs had covered the greater portion of the wall, and many gave evidence that much ability and time was being wasted by pupils in blindly copying indifferent prints rather than painting direct from nature. The writers suggested that the clauses should be revised, that smaller prizes be presented for copying than for original work, that special prizes be offered for drawings and paintings from nature; further, that an alteration of the class be made by which local sketch in water colours be substituted for the collection of oleographs.-Received, and to be referred to the schedule committee for next show.” Ref: 1896 ‘Maitland District.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 5 May, p. 7. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136261619

 

1896, May 9. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] IV. A GENERAL VIEW OF THE RACE, EMBODYING MANY OF THEIR CUSTOMS Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 9 May, p. 12. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132407487

 

1896, May 16. Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines [By W. A. Squire.] IV. A GENERAL VIEW OF THE RACE, EMBODYING MANY OF THEIR CUSTOMS Ref: 1896 ‘Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 16 May, p. 11. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132404618

 

1896, June 12. [Book Review] NMH receives (from Messrs. R. Blair and Sons of West Maitland) a copy of “Ritual, Myth, and Customs of the Australian Aborigines,” written by Mr. W. A. Squire. Ref: 1896 ‘Maitland District.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 12 June, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136263382 Other reviews are here: 1896 ‘RECENT PUBLICATIONS.’, Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), 20 June, p. 12. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108784015 and 1896 ‘LECTURE ON LEPROSY.’, The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), 30 June, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article231656341 and advertisement for sale for 1 shilling: 1896 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 11 July, p. 1. , viewed 14 Jun 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132403402

 

1896, July 19. Recent Publications. Short review of “Ritual, Myth and Customs” Ref: 1896 ‘RECENT PUBLICATIONS.’, Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 – 1930), 19 July, p. 3. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130399110

 

1896, July, 25. Aboriginal Names [By W. A. Squire]

Aboriginal Names.
[By W. A. Squire.]

The following list of Aboriginal names of some of the New South Wales and Queensland towns, rivers, etc., with their meaning, I have compiled from various sources. It may prove of interest to some readers of this journal. The aboriginal nomenclature is remarkably euphonious, and it is to be regretted that imported names of little beauty, and in most instances devoid of sense in their application, should have been adopted as disfigurements to our maps and gazetteers.

Maitland — Mindarriba

Newcastle — Malubinba — Place of ferns

Tocal — Plenty ducks

Wollombi — Meeting of waters

Parramatta — Parra-Matta — Eels here

Woolloomooloo — Wulla-Mulla — Burial ground

Wollongong — Wolyungah — Fishing place

Kiama — Kiari Mai — Fertile district

Ulladulla — Wooloodorr — Harbour of refuge

Coogee — Coojah — Smell of seaweed

Sydney District — Caddie

North Sydney — Cammeray

Wagga-Wagga — Worgan Worgan — Place of crows

North Head — Boree

Middle Head — Cubba Cubba

South Head — Cuttai

Pinchgut — Mattiwunye

Goat Island — Memel

Sydney Cove — Narrane

Fort Macquarie — Toobergoola

Manly — Kayeeny

Bulgar — Bulgari — Boomerangs

Burburgate — Place of belts

Murrumbidgee — Beautiful river

Kurkurduebidgee — Place of native companions

Boat Alley — Eurobodella

Trialgang — Taralga

Larry’s Lake — Larella

Yarra Yarra — flowing quickly

Lachlan River — Calare

Peel River — Callala

Nepean River — Warragamba

Darling River — Calewatta

Murray River — Goolwa

Watagan — Drinking place

Mia Mia — Place of shelters

Muswellbrook — Bimborreen

Drilldool — Tareel Dul — Brown reeds

Yalaroi — Plenty stones

Wee Waa — Wi-Wha — Fire cast away

Walgett — Wolger — High Hill

Breeza — Biridja — Place of fleas

Pokataroo — Bukkitaroo — Wide river

Pilliga — Bilagha — Head of scrub oak

Gundamaine — Gundimaian — House on the stream

Warrah — Worra — On the left hand

Barwan — Bawun— Great, wide, awful

Breewarrina — Buri-Warina — Clumps of acacia

Brigalow — Buriagala

Namoi — Ngamai — Place of acacia trees

Gwydir — Guida — Red banks

Boggabri — Bukkiberai — Creeks

Gunnedah — Gunida — Plenty stones

Culgoa — Kulgoa — Returning

Manilla River — Munila — Round about

Millee — Milli — White pipeclay

Narrabri — Nurra-burai — Forks

Henriendry — Inariendrai — Tale of the woman

Guligal — Long grass seed

Coghill — Kaghil — bad (water)

Mt. Peter Botte (Q ) — Numbalburroway — Rock emu

Mt. Alexandra (Q ) — Manjalgooloon — Lightning mountain

TableMountain (Q.) — Bab baboolla — Two mountains

Balonne — Pelican

Stradbroke Is. (Q.) — Minjerriba

Gympie (Q ) — Stinging tree

Toowoomba (Q.) — Choowoom-ba — Plenty melons

Warrego — Bad

Colarendabry — Kolorinbrai — Plenty flowers

Mooki — Mukai — Flinty

Milroy — Murrowa’arai — Having hedge hogs

Mercadool — Murkudul — Place of oaks

Collymungle — Kollemung-gul — Broad water

Warrawalong (Mt.) — To the left of creek

Carrington — Onybygamba

Myall Lakes — Myall — Stranger

Comleroy — Kamil — The tribe Kamilaroi

Eunonyhreenyha — Burial place of a Chief

Bogan River — Bungan-gallo

Bondi — A nulla nulla

Coolah — Coola — Native bear

Kurrajong — Currie-jung — Hibiscus Heterophylla

Yass — Yarr

Narandera — Narrungdeerie

Turee — Turi — Water weeds

Woy Woy — Woiyo Woiyo — Plenty grass

Burra-gurrah — Devil’s rock

Mogo Creek — Mogo — A stone axe

Gibbergunyah (Mt.) — Stone house, cave

Hunter River — Coonanbarra

Hawkesbury River — Deerabubbin

Dubbo — White clay or sand

Pott’s Point — Carrajeen

Farm Cove — Yoolaugh — Bora ground

Lady Macquarie’s Chair — Yurong

Blue’s Point — Warung

Cockatoo Island — Warrieabah

Botany — Zwiagal.

The locality of Newcastle was named Malubinba on account of it being covered by a growth of fern called by the aborigines Malubin or Moolubin, the suffix ba being a common one signifying ” place of” or ” here.”

The name of Maitland ” Mindarriba” is pronounced with a strong accent on the darr : of its meaning I have no knowledge.

If your readers would emulate the example of Mr. Keys, of Muswellbrook, and record the aboriginal names before they have been forgotten or become Anglicized they would be adding valuable matter to the geographical history of the colony.

Ref: 1896 ‘Aboriginal Names.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 25 July, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132399107

 

1896, August 1. [Meetings] MAITLAND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY.

The Bi-monthly MEETING will be held in the Society’s Room, Technological Museum, on MONDAY EVENING, August 3rd, at 8 p.m. Paper will be read by Messrs. W. A. Squire and A. J. Prentice, B.A., on “The Maruba Gibbers of the Australian Aborigines, with notes on Aboriginal Magic and Astrological Crystal Gazing.”

Paper by Mr. E. Tipper, on” Vitality of Seeds.”
W. BUTTERWORTH,
W.J. ENRIGHT.

Joint Hon. Secs. 597 Ref: 1896 ‘Advertising’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 1 August, p. 7. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136258979

 

1896, August 3. W.A. Squire delivers paper on The Murruba Gibbers of the Australian Aborigines at Maitland Scientific Society. Ref: 1896 ‘The Murruba Gibbers of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 8 August, p. 11. , viewed 28 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132400011

The Murruba Gibbers of the Australian Aborigines.

Following is the full text of papers read on Monday night to the Maitland Scientific Society by ; Mr. A. J. Prentice, B.A., and Mr. W. A. Squire.

Mr. Prentice’s paper was to the following effect:

The two specimens which are before your notice, to-night are the property of Mrs. J. S. Skeet of Moree. During a recent visit to that t own Mr. Skeet brought these two stones under my notice and, recognising at once their scientific importance, I have obtained the loan of them for the purpose of having them properly described, reported on, and photographed. The circumstances under which these sacred mystic symbols of the Aborigines came into the possession of Europeans are strongly assertive of their absolute identity with the far famed and much discussed but hitherto unprocurable “Murrubagibbers” of the Australian Aboriginal witch doctors. In the year 1881 Mrs Skeet while passing along a track leading from the saw-mills to the beach near Raleigh township on the Bellinger River came upon a camp of blacks from which all the men were absent. While looking round the camp she peered into a hollow tree, and there amongst weapons and other aboriginal treasures she found these two stones wrapped up in rags. She took them out and asked a gin what they were — the gin either could not or would not state but, she said that the lady could have them, and that they had belonged to an old blackfellow who had died on the Clarence. Thinking that the stones probably had some tribal or religious significance, Mrs. Skeet kept them, but unfortunately they have become rather more chipped and less evenly smooth than when she found them. The blacks often asked Mrs. Skeet what she had done with the stones, and if she would return them —in fact, they pestered her incessantly about them until the time she left the district. The stones are as to shape most approaching what is known as an “ellipsoid,” but the ends of the larger one are rather more pointed, and of the other rather more blunt than in the true ellipsoid, and the girth of each of them is not a true circle. Their dimensions and weight are as follows : —  Larger : Weight, 171/2oz. ; length of longest axis, 31/2 inches; length of greatest diameter, 2. 9-16in.; circumference round ends, 91/2 in. ; circumference round middle, 8in. Smaller: Weight, 16oz. (originally about 16oz. 2drms.); length of longest axis, 3 3-16in. ; length of greatest diameter, 21/2 in. ; circumference round ends, 9 1-16in. ; circumference round middle, 73/4 in.  The larger stone has markedly pointed ends and approaches a Lisbon lemon in shape, the ends of the smaller one are markedly oblate. Each stone is composed of the same mineral and they have evidently been manufactured together. The mineral is aragonite, one of the crystalline forms of limestone, its chemical composition is calcium carbonate the same as the closely allied mineral calcite (or spar) which it much resembles. It contains 56 per cent. of lime, the oxide of calcium (Ca. O.), and 44 per cent of carbonic acid (C02), thus forming its symbol (Ca CO2 ). Aragonite crystallises in what is called the rhombic system, and in the places where chips have been knocked off these stones, the crystalline structure of their component mineral can be clearly seen. They have evidently each been ground down from a large aragonite crystalline mass, and as aragonite is a relatively soft mineral standing only 3.5 to 4 in Moh’s scale of hardness in which quartz is 7 and the diamond 10, it will be seen that it or calcite, the average hardness of which is 3, were the most suitable materials from which the aboriginal high priest could make his sacred emblems. The colour of each stone is the same — a yellowish white — quite usual in aragonite, and the lustre is translucent. The stones must have been artificially made, as, under natural conditions, no substance would however much it were rolled or water-worn, attain such a shape, especially aragonite, which would splinter and break off along the planes of its crystallization. This and calcite would be the best white minerals available to the blacks for easy grinding to the required shape, but which would, when around down, keep its form fairly well. Mr. Frank Rutley, F.G S., in his “Mineralogy,” p 84 (1887 ed.), says of aragonite that it sometimes “occurs in basalts and lavas as a deposit from warm solutions.” Mr, Grenville A. J. Cole, F.G.S., in his “Aids in Practical Geology,” p. 141 (1891 ed.), says that aragonite is common in the deposits of warm waters, and forms radial groups in the cavities of altered rocks. So that the probable source of the original aragonite masses from which these stones have been ground is some zeolitic deposit in some of our lava flows. As to the amount of knowledge possessed by blacks at the present day with regard to these stones I have not as yet been able get much direct information, and if they are “murrubagibbers” it is almost useless to show them to an aborigine and question him as to what they are, as the very essence of his knowledge of them is the obligation put upon him not to speak of them to a woman or a white man under penalty of death or severe mishap. One old black at Moree, who seemed over 60 years of age, said that he knew nothing of them as regards religious or Bora ceremonies, but still he had a special name for the stones and called one of them when shown to him — “Mingoora.”

A black at Mungindi on the New South Wales and Queensland borders is also said to have been in possession of one of these stones. The blacks on the Gregory River in North Queensland, who are even now only partly civilized and in constant communication with wild blacks, either cannot or will not give any information as to such stones as these being used by their race in its tribal ceremonies.

Mr. Squire’s paper was as follows : —

The two objects described and historically noticed in the foregoing piper by Mr. A. J. Prentice I have no hesitation in pronouncing to be two of the Murruba Gibbers of the Manning River tribe

of Australian aborigines, and as such they command considerable interest from the ethnological and anthropological student. Although several of the small gibbers carried by initiates and given to them at the Bora ceremony have come into the possession of the whites, I have no knowledge of the larger ones ever having been procured before. I think I am right, in saying these two stones are the only ones of their kind outside the control of the aborigines. And this is scarcely to be wondered at, considering the zealous manner in which the sacred magic working stones are guarded, and the penalties attaching to their desecration at the instance of women or white men. To understand the superstitious regard with which the aborigines favour their gibbers, it will be necessary first to know the occasions which bring them into use, and the hidden magical power with which the black supposes them to be surrounded.

At the great, religious and educating ceremony of the Murri or Australian Aboriginal Tribes, during that portion of it which is most impressive and which from its mysterious nature is calculated to become deeply imprinted on the young initiate’s wondering mind, the chief initiating Karaji before each of the carved figures which flank the Mystic Avenue joining the two Bora Circles dances a descriptive dance peculiarly pertaining to each figure and brings from his mouth the jo-e-a or magic of the figure or totem before which he stands and in turn he exhibits the particular material, chalk, calcite quartz, or flint whichever substance belongs to or is considered to be the charm attaching to each totem. The initiate then simulates death and is brought to life under a now totemic name which must be revealed to no ono who has not passed through the initiating ceremony. At this stage the initiate is shown the sacred wand, bullroaror, or Murrawan, the gift of Baiamai, the Aboriginal God, and this instrument which by imitating the voice of Durramullan inspires the initiate with manhood. He is also shown the great Magic of the tribe by which the Karajis work their spells of enchantment, their blessings or their curses and he is at the third initiation handed a small bag of stringy bark fibre containing a gibber or mundi which generally consists of a small rock crystal but sometimes of a section of bone either of a man or kangaroo. This gibber is held in great veneration. It must not be shown to an uninitiated man or to any woman on pain of death. It is the badge of manhood, and must never leave its owner’s possession, folded in his “bor”or girdle which he received at the first initiation ; he must protect it with his life. Dr. John Fraser says that among the Gringai tribe of the Manning it is not until a man has passed through six initiations and received six gibbers that he attains full manhood. The gibber plays a most important part in the superstitious beliefs of the aborigines. The tribes believe one and all in the existence of visible and invisible gibbers— Murruba or good and Mitchet or bad gibbers. Neither sickness nor danger is attributed by them to natural causes, they firmly believe that some enemy taking advantage of an unguarded moment has struck them with an invisible Mitchet gibba. Among the Port Macquarie tribes a special evil spirit, the mighty and ferocious Wandong, placed white crystal gibbers in men’s bodies to make them ill. All impending danger can be charmed, away, all accomplishment can be rendered easy by the magical assistance of the sacred stones. Mr. Howitt relates that  “seeing a Tatungolung very lame I asked him what was the matter. He said, ‘Some fellow put bottle in my foot.’ I found him suffering from acute rheumatism. His idea was that some enemy had found his foot track and buried in it a piece of broken bottle, and this was by magical influence caused to enter and wound his foot.” This story throws some light on the state of the aboriginal mind, and inferences may be made as to the many magical purposes for which the gibbers could be called into action. The strong belief of all the aborigines in this magical power, both of his own and of others, by its very strength carries out in many instances the effect imagined. Blacks who have become possessed of an idea that they are subject to the evil influence, in the majority of cases die from sheer fright at the imagined impending invisible danger, and this being so each death naturally strengthens the power of the Karajis or magicians of the tribe, who, strange to say, have implicit faith in their own ability. Unlike the modern wizards, the Karajis are unable to “give the show away,” because of their unswerving belief that they are the genuine article.

An Australian philologist treating as a root the word gibber (the sacred stone) has traced “Bora,” the general name of the initiating rite through the word gibbir or Kippar (a man), Kipperah (a young man), and Kabborah, one name of the ceremony. To show that the tribal laws against the revealers of the mysteries were strictly enforced, Dr. John Fraser in his paper to the Instituzion Ethnographique (1882) relates the following story:— “Many years ago some shepherds on the Upper Williams had obtained a few of these crystals and had shown them to the gins. When this became known to the chiefs of the tribe they assembled in council to consider what should be done. One old man, a great orator, made an inflammatory speech, declaring that the white men should be put to death and not the gins. Accordingly the blacks watched their opportunity, killed the shepherds separately, and feasted on their bodies. This is a well authenticated case of cannibalism amongst the Gringai blacks. For this murder one of the blacks was afterwards banged at Dungog.” The Kakian (Malay Archipelago) initiates each received at the ceremony from the hands of the officiating chief priest, a stick adorned at both ends with cocks or cassowary’s feathers. The sticks are supposed to have been given to the lads by the devil at the time when, during the ceremony, he restored them to life and they serve as a token that the lads have been in the spirit land. Until after the ceremony the Kakians are forbidden to marry. Among some of the tribes of the North American Indians are certain religious associations which are only open to candidates who have gone through a pretence of being killed and brought to life again. Captain Carver mentions that at a particular juncture in the initiation ceremony the old chief threw at the candidate a small object like a bean. Whereupon the young man fell motionless as if dead. From the same writer we gather that each member of the society who has been initiated has a small bag made of the skin of some animal such as the otter, wild cat, snake, boar, owl, etc., presumably of which ever animal is his totem, in which he keeps his medicine or charms. They believe that from these charms which are generally small stones, issues a spirit or breath which has the power not only to knock down and kill a man, but to set him up and restore him to life. The Revd. Lorimer Fison, speaking of the Banks Islanders, says that “some of the people connect themselves with an object, generally an animal or a stone, which they imagine to have a certain very close natural relation to themselves.” The life of a man is bound up with the stone; if it gets broken or lost the man will die.” Some of the Papuans unite the life of a new horn child sympathetically with that of a tree by driving the pebble into the bark of a tree. This is supposed to give them complete mastery over the child’s life; if the tree is cut down the child will die.

The negroes of Guinea use small stones as fetiches or charms, and they carry them about concealed under their arms. These stones are traded to them by the priests alter being formally consecrated.

Amongst nearly all primitive people white is the colour of the sun, the preservative against all evil, and the idea has survived amongst civilised folk to the present day, and the Hindoos dedicate white stones to Siva the Eternal, the ever blessed, white horses are sacred to the sun in Persia, white elephants are sacred in India and Burmah, in England some of the Welsh peasantry even now whiten their houses to keep away the evil one. Dr. Tylor, one of the most learned of modern ethnologists, classes stone worship in India as a survival of a rite belonging to the rude indigines of the land, and Mr. Gomme, the President of the Folklore Society, treats as a similar survival in Europe the unwrought stone at Hyettos, which represented Herakles, the 30 stones the Pharaeans worshipped as gods, the rude stone representing the Thespian Eros. The Kaffirs of India say with regard to the sacred unwrought, “These stand for god, but we know not his shape,” and the history of the sacred use of monoliths commences at this point, and ends with the sculptured glories of Greece. Among all the Greeks rude stones wore sacred before the images of the gods. Miss Gordon Gumming In the Hebridesmentions that in the Isle of Arran is a stone of a groan colour and the size of a goose egg known as the stone of St. Molingus, and kept in the custody of the Clan Chattan; the popular belief was not only that it cured disease, but that if it were thrown at an advancing foe they would be terrorstricken and retreat, and it was also a solemn .and sacred thing to swear by.

The power of working magic by means of charms as an adjunct to superstitious belief is as widespread as the myth of the deluge. To this phase of thought belong the belief in the power of a potato to charm away rheumatism, the belief that a piece of coal carried by a burglar will bring him luck, and the similar widespread ideas with regard to the horseshoe, shamrock, and four leaved clover. The physicians of the age of Charles II were wont to administer a decoction made from pulverised mummy. Their argument was that the mummies had lasted a very long time, and that their patients ought to do so likewise. And the practice of the leeches of the middle ages, and even later of giving draughts of thrice distilled dew, wherein hath been dipped a child’s caul, previously sprinkled with powder scraped from the skull of a murderer which had been snatched from the grave at midnight under the baleful influence of the moon’s eclipse and to the dreary accompaniment of the hooting of a horned owl, and such like remarkable nostrums, the many old housewife charms for toothache and the thousand and one religious charms of Roman Christianity for all “the ills that flesh is heir to,” — these and many others belong to the great family of charms, fetishism, magic, and supernatural science which form the principal stock in trade of the priests and medicine men in every quarter of the world from the Esquimo to the Fuegian, from Lady Montmerenci, with her potato in her pocket to charm away rheumatism, to the Australian aborigines who owned the gibbers now before me.

In addition to the magic-working charm mysteriously contained in the sacred crystals was a belief in their power to enable the possessor to foretell events, and in the science of fortune-telling the Australian Karaji will not be outdone by Madam Blank or Professor Dash, the direct descendants of the Witch of Endor, or the augurs of Rome who predicted the death of Caesar. He would upon the tribes embarking upon any important expedition consult his oracles, and in a semi-hypnotic state chant in a low monotone the coming glory of the undertaking. Seldom it was that he would predict failure, as that would immediately cast reflection on the powers of the magical objects calling for the reverence and respect of the tribe. To this particular phase of the extensive subject belongs scrying or crystal gazing, which was common in Ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome, became a wild and wide-spread craze under Dr. Dee and Robert Flood, the famous and profound Rosicrucian leaders in the 16th century, and has recently commanded considerable attention on the part of the Society for Psychical Research. By gazing into a crystal, ball the subject was supposed to see events happening at great distances, scenes past, present, and future, and when sufficiently adept the student of scrying asserted his ability to call forth spirits from the mighty deep, and in fact, do anything under the sun, excepting anything of use or benefit, to the world.

The evolution of these ideas was long, slow, and complicated. It is not unlikely that the idea of “luck” was evolved by a process of meditation on a mere series of lucky accidents. Such as, for instance, a man having found a peculiar stone, succeeded in hunting, fishing, or war, he having been before the finding the reverse of successful. “This random way,” says Mr. Andrew Lang, “of connecting causes and effects which have really no interrelation is a common error of early reasoning.” How many of us as boys have kept particular marbles or particular coins for luck ? But there are other ways by which magic or unknown power may become attached to particular objects and even places; as for instance, a superficial resemblance of the fetish to other objects which the magical system of reasoning imagines to be influenced by it. Other stones, objects, or places may be dreamed of by the Karajis and afterwards found in a stone or object resembling that of the dream. Instances of the survival in modern life of the savage regard for magic, their belief in their own magical powers and the magical powers of others, are very extensive, and the early history of England, Wales, and Scotland, and the Bardic history of Ireland, exhibits ample evidence whereon may be made the bold statement that the remote ancestors of all Great Britain religiously regarded similar objects to the “gibbers” of the aborigines and held similar views with regard to their magical power and mystical meaning.

Ref: Ref: 1896 ‘The Murruba Gibbers of the Australian Aborigines.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 8 August, p. 11. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132400011

 

1896, August 4. MAITLAND, SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY.

The usual bi-monthly meeting of the Maitland Scientific Society was held in the society’s room, Technological Museum, last evening. The president (Mr. W. S. Pender) occupied the chair. Papers were read by Messrs. W. A. Squire, A. J. Prentice, B.A., and Edwin Tipper. The papers read by the two former gentlemen treated on ” The Maruba Gibbers of the Australian Aborigines, with notes on aboriginal magic and astrological crystal gazing.” Mr. Prentice exhibited two Maruba gibbers, which were found about 16 years ago in a blackfellow’s camp near the township of Raleigh, Bellinger River, by Mrs. Skeet, of Moree. Mr. Prentice in a very interesting article dealt with the exhibits as a geologist. He showed that, in shape, they were like what is known as an ellipsoid. The weight of one was 17¼oz, and of the other 16oz. Each stone was composed of the same mineral, and had evidently been manufactured together. The mineral was aragonite, one of the crystalline forms of limestone, and its chemical composition was calcium carbonate, the same as the closely allied mineral calcite or spar, which it much resembled. The stones had evidently been ground down from a large aragonite crystalline mass. The colour of each stone was a yellowish white, and the lustre was translucent. They must have been artificially made, as under natural conditions no substance would attain such. a shape, especially aragonite, which would splinter and break off along the planes of its crystallization. As to the amount of knowledge possessed by blacks at the present day with regard to the stones, Mr. Prentice stated that he had been unable to get much direct information. He believed that they were “Maruba Gibbers,” concerning which blacks either cannot or will not give any information. Mr. Squire’s paper was explanatory and supplementary to that read by Mr. Prentice. In a carefully studied article he treated of aboriginal gibbers, their meaning and use, with comparative notes on primitive magic, fetishism, medicine, and modern crystal gazing, and survivals in myth, tradition, and custom. He showed clearly that the exhibits which were the subject of Mr. Prentice’s paper were “gibbers,” which were the property of the medicine-man or karaji of the blacks. The paper was very interesting; and contained a great fund of information. Mr. Edwin Tipper’s paper was lengthy but very interesting, and was entitled ” Vitality of Seeds.” It showed that the writer had gone thoroughly into his subject. On the motion of Mr. J. E. Carter, seconded by Mr. H. O S. White, a hearty vote of thanks was passed to the three gentlemen who had prepared the papers for the evening. The president suggested that the discussions on future papers might well be left over until the night of meeting following that on which they were read. Ref: 1896 ‘MAITLAND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 4 August, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136264693

 

1896, August 15. [Advertising] Clearing-out Sale of FURNITURE, &c., At the Residence of MR. W. A. SQUIRE, CAMPBELL’S HILL, SATURDAY, 15TH INST., AT THREE O’CLOCK. O.K. YOUNG has received instructions from Mr. W.A. Squire to sell by auction, at his residence, Campbell’s Hill, on SATURDAY, 15thAugust, 1896, at Three o’clock, A QUANTITY OF HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, Consisting of – DRAWING ROOM SUITE, 3 Small Tables, Hall Linoleum, Bedstead and Spring Mattreass, Dining-room Table, 6 Austrian Chairs, Oil-cloths, Blinds and Window Curtains, Cornice Poles, Sideboard, Easy Chair, Dressing Table, Pictures, Sofa, Kitchen Table, Lot Crockery, Trays, Set Dish Covers, Lot Books, Tubs, Clothes Basket, etc., etc., etc., Terms cash. 2862. Ref: 1896 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 15 August, p. 8. , viewed 14 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132402599

 

1896, August 15. Aboriginal Names of Places.

Mr. W. A. SQUIRE, of West Maitland, writes as follows :-The following list of the aboriginal names for some of the New South Wales and Queensland towns, rivers, &c., with their meaning I have compiled from various sources, and it may prove of interest to some of your readers. The aboriginal nomenclature is remarkably euphonius, and it is to be regretted that imported names of little beauty and in most instances devoid of sense in their application should have been adopted as disfigurements to our maps and gazetters. The locality of Newcastle was named Malubinba by the aborigines, on account of it being covered by a growth of fern, called by them malubin, or moolubin, the suffix be being a common one, signifying “place ‘of ” or “here.” The list shows many instances where the euphony of the primitive names has been spoiled by the process of Anglicizing; for example, what a glorious conception of the beautiful must the individual have had who changed Larella into Larry’s Lake!

Maitland : Mindarria.

Newcastle: Malubinba; place of ferns.

Tocal: Plenty ducks.

Wollombi: Meeting of waters.

Parramatta: Parra-Matta; eels here.

Woolloomooloo : Wullu-Mulla ; burial ground.

Wollongong : Wolyungah; fishing place.

Kiama : Kiari-mai; fertile district.

Ulladulla: Wooloodorr; harbour of refuge.

Coogee: Coojah; smell of seaweed.

Sydney district: Caddie.

North Sydney : Cammeray.

Wagga Wagga: Worgan Worgan; place of crows.

North Head: Bores.

Middle Head: Cubba Cubba.

South Head: Cuttai.

Pinchgut : Mattiwunye.

Goat Island : Memel.

Sydney Cove: Warrane.

Fort Madquarie: Toobergoola.

Manly: Kayeemy.

Bulgar: Bulgari; boomerangs.

Burburgate: Place of belts.

Murrumbidgee: Beautiful river.

Kurkurducbidge: Place of native companions.

Boat Alley: Eurobodella.

Trial Gang: Taralga.

Larry’s Lake: Larella.

Yarra Yarra : Flowing quickly.

Lachlan River : Calare. ,

Peel River: Callala.

Darling River: Calewatta.

Murray River : Goolwa.

Watagan: Drinking place.

Musweltbrook : Bimbooreen.

Drilldool: Tareel-diil; brown reeds.

Yalarbi.: Plenty stones.

Wee Waa: Wi-wha; fire cast away.

Walgett: Wolger; High hill.

Breeza: Biridja; place of fleas.

Pokataroo: Bukkitaroo; wide river.

Piliga : Bilaglia; head of scrub oak.

Gundamaine: Gundimaian; house on the stream.

Warrah: Worra; on the left hand.

Barwan : Bawun; great wide awful.

Brewarrina: Buri-warina; clumps of acacia.

Namoi: Ngamai; place of acacia trees.

Briglow : Buriagala.

Gwydir.: Guida; red banks.

Boggabri: Bukkiberai; creeks.

Gunnedah: Gunida; plenty stones.

Culgoa: Kulgoa; returning.

Manilla River: Manilla; round about.

Millie: Milli; white pipeclay.

Narrabri: Nurra-burai; forks.

Henriendry : Inariendrai: sale of the woman.

Guligal: Long grass seed.

Coghill: Kaghil; bad (water).

Mt. Peter Bottle (Q.): Numbalburroway; rock emu.

Mt. Alexander (Q.) : Manjalgooloon; lightning mountain.

Table Mountain (Q.): Bahbabootla; two mountains.

Balonne : Pelican.

Stradbroke Island (Q.): Minjerriba.

Gympie (Q.) : Stinging tree.

Toowoomba (Q.) : Choowoom-ba; plenty melons.

Collarendabry: Kolorinbrai; plenty flowers.

Warrego: Bad.

Mooki: Mukai; flinty.

Molroy : Murrowolarai; having hedge hogs.

Mercadool: Murkudul; place of oaks.

Collymingle: Kollemung-gul; broad water.

Warrawalong (Mount);’to the left of the creek.

Carrington: Onybygamba. –

Myall Lakes: Myall; stranger.

Comleroy : Kamil; the tribe Kamilaroi.

Eunonyhyeenyha: Burial place of a chief.

Bogan River: Bungan-gallo.

Bondi : A nulla nulla.

Coolah : Coola; native bear.

Kurrajong : Currie-jung; hibiscus heterophylla.

Yass: Yarr.

Narandera: Narrungdeerie.

Turee: Turi; water weeds.

Woy Woy: Woiyo-Woiyof; plenty grass.

Burra-gurrah : Devil’s Rock.

Mogo Creek : Mogo; a stone axe.

Gibber Gunyah (Mt.): stone house cave.

Runter River : Coonanbarra.

Hawkesbury River : Deerabubbin.

Dubbo” White clay or sand.

Pott’s Point : Carrajeen.

Farm Cove: Yoolangh; bora ground.

Mrs. Macquarie’s Chair: Yurong.

Blue’s Point : Warung.

Cockatoo Island : Warrienbah.

Botany : Zwiagal.

Ref: 1896 ‘Aboriginal Names of Places.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 15 August, p. 12. , viewed 14 Jun 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136263457

 

1896, August 22. “THE NEW ARCADIA”

On the 15th of September next a new operetta, entitled ” The New Arcadia,” will be presented in the Town Hall, West Maitland, in connection with the Girls’ High School. The production should be specially interesting to the residents of the Newcastle and Maitland districts, because of the versatility and piquancy of the work, because the libretto is from the pen of Mr. W. A. Squire, and the music has been written by Mr. G. F. King, A.R.C.O., because the performance will be undertaken by local artists, and because the staging will excel anything of the kind that has been attempted previously in West Maitland. The choruses will be sustained by 80 specially trained voices, the orchestra will consist of 15 of the leading musicians of the district, and the costumes will be designed in strict harmony with the various characters. A well known lady from Sydney has been engaged to complete the studies of the young ladies in the minuets and other dances which will be given, and every effort is being made to perfect the performers in their respective parts. Ref: 1896 ‘”THE NEW ARCADIA”‘, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 22 August, p. 8. , viewed 21 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136257828


1896, August 24
. With the Blacks The Grengai Tribe. The Upper {Paterson, Allyn, and William Rivers. No mention of W.A. Squire, but of interest. Ref:

 

1896, September 4. Book Review. “Ritual, Myth and Customs of the Australian Aborigines.” Ref: 1896 ‘Our Book Review’, The Sydney Stock and Station Journal (NSW : 1896 – 1924), 4 September, p. 9. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120772777


1896, September 5
. “The New Arcadia” Ref: 1896 ‘”THE NEW ARCADIA.”‘, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 5 September, p. 8. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article135772542  

 

1896, September 12. THE NEW ARCADIA. A full advertisement of the coming performance by the Girls’ High School pupils appears in another column. The many details incidental to the production have been arranged, and the dificulties which are ever present at an early stage of the rehearsals have been surmounted. There can be no hesitation in saying that the performance bids fair to be an undoubted success, reflecting great credit upon all concerned. Ref: 1896 ‘THE NEW ARCADIA.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 12 September, p. 8. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article135774631  


1896, September 12
. ‘The New Arcadia.’ AN ORIGINAL OPERETTA.

For the first time in Maitland, there will next week be produced an operatic composition of which both libretto and music are the fruit of local talent. “The New Arcadia,” an operetta which is to be staged at the Town Hall on Tuesday evening, is wholly the work of Mr. W. A. Squire, and the music that of Mr. G. F. King, A.R.C.O. Not a word of the libretto, not a bar of the music is foreign: the operetta is purely and absolutely a Maitland work, and in that character should be attractive, as we hope it will prove, to a large audience.

But the origin of the operetta is not the attraction on which it chiefly relies. The conception of the piece, the words, the music, will be found to possess a merit amply justifying a liberal public patronage. Mr. Squire has imagines an amusing story, expressed in effective dialogue, and has written poetical verses combining wit, humour and sparkle; and Mr. King has wedded the author’s words to sweet and stirring music. There is an abundance of spectacular effect in the operetta, and variety of interest, and the music is distinguished by corresponding light, shade, and differing characteristics. Dance music involuntarily sets the feet moving to its time, and pathetic strains of a slumber song will be heard with exquisite pleasure, an enlivening march and rattling choruses will cheer the spirits; and slow movements will soothe them. It is this performance which will be presented on the day named in aid of the funds of the Public High School for Girls, by a chorus of about eighty voices, an orchestra of fifteen performers, and selected principal singers of Maitland and Newcastle. A feature of the operetta is a grand procession of the nations, and other incidents are a skirt dance and a Spanish dance. We present a summary of the plot.

The scene is a picturesque glen somewhere in the bush of Australia. Thither have resorted, under their Queen Agatha, a number of girls who are determined to do without the tyrant known as man (“if they can,” as they observe a lively chorus) and in the solitude of the forest to acquire all the wisdom which books can furnish. Their tutor is Menos, the only member of the sterner sex who is allowed to approach the Arcadians. The burden of the dialogue is borne by Agatha and Menos, and the former at some length and with some acridity of temper explains why she and her company have adjured the companionship of man and worldly society. Menos, on his part, has his griefs. He is deformed and ill-favoured; and, contrasting his own ungainliness with the beautiful forms and features of his pupils, he cannot be doleful. Agatha endeavours to console him by assuring him that she recognises the gem-like beauty of his soul, but had chosen him him purposely because his exterior was repellent, and not likely to interfere with the purpose of the Arcadians – to do without man either individually or collectively. There presently, however, appears cause for belief that the Queen of the Arcadians at least is not as satisfied with seclusion as she seems to be. A very effective song and chorus enables her band to express their joy that they are safe from the world’s alarms, distractions and disturbing incidents. And then one of their number is lulled to sleep by the strains of a slumber song which the words and the music unite to constitute the gem of the piece. Menos also succumbs to the soothing notes, and Agatha then enters and, believing herself alone, makes tuneful confession that she is not sincere in her avowed hate of the world and love, and that a craving for notoriety as the best substitute for fame has moved her. Menos, awaking, overhears, and when he comes forward is compelled by the Queen to swear to keep secret her avowal. He takes the opportunity to tell her of his love for her, only to be rejected. There is then introduced the grand procession of the nations, each representative being appropriately garbed, and Menos as chorus speaks descriptive verses. A chorus of all the nations greets Australia’s entrance, and in a song and chorus is depicted her great destiny as Queen of the Southern Sea. And then as it becomes known to the Arcadians that the Queen repents her vow, and as Menos exhorts return to the world as the only means of living true, unselfish, and noble lives, they resolve to abandon their scheme. And Menos once more offers himself to Agatha who with some hesitancy accepts him, and the operetta closes with the prospect of wedding bells and the characters join in the finale –
Away — away!
To be joyous is not sinning.
Never yet did sad beginning
Make the task of life a play
What avails a life of fretting,
Learn the duty of forgetting
If the stars are sometimes setting
Others rise as bright as they.
Come away, haste away!
To our homes we must be going
Time and tide are swiftly flowing
let us take them while we may,
Away — Away!
Away — Away!
From the sweet life of our dreaming,
We can see the future gleaming
Mid the dull and sombre grey
All the past will kindle clearer
And our lives will be sincerer,
Bonds of love will draw us nearer
To the friends we thrust away
Then away, swift away!
Pleasure’s stream is stronger, clearer,
Life is sweeter, love is dearer,
For the lessons of to-day.

Away–away!

We may add that rehearsals have for some weeks been proceeding, and every effort is being made to place the operetta in a worthy manner upon the stage. In the case of so unprecedented event as the production of a local musical drama, the promoters of the entertainment are entitled to expect a hearty recognition of their enterprise. And we repeat that those who resort to the Town Hall on Tuesday evening next may be assured of the enjoyment of a musical and dramatic treat. Ref: 1896 ‘”The New Arcadia.”‘, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 12 September, p. 2. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123772860

 

1896, September 12. [Advertisement].  The New Arcadia. 1896, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 12 September, p. 8. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-page10379814

 

1896, September 12. “The New Arcadia” An Original Operetta. Ref: 1896 ‘”The New Arcadia.”‘, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 12 September, p. 4. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132399588

 

1896, September 14.  “THE NEW ARCADIA” – Our readers are reminded by an advertisement elsewhere of the purposed production to-morrow evening, in the West Maitland Town Hall, of “the locally written and composed operetta,” “The New Arcadia,” of which we gave a precis in our Saturday’s issue. There is every prospect of a large audience, as the booking of seats has been extensive. And there will be no disappointment experienced by that audience, as the promoters are conducting practices with the most painstaking industry, so that full justice may be done to Mr. Squire’s words and Mr. King’s music. A book of the words of tho operetta will be distributed to the audience, an accommodation which we are sure will be appreciated. Ref: 1896 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 14 September, p. 2. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123774147  

1896, September 15. THE NEW ARCADIA. By advertisement in this issue the public are finally reminded of the production at the Town Hall, West Maitland, this evening of the operetta “The New Arcadia.” The charmingly written work has been thoroughly studied by the performers, and a highly successful performance may be anticipated. The costumes of the young ladies, the stage effects, and the orchestral portion will form features which the people of the Maitland district will have few opportunities of witnessing locally. Ref: 1896 ‘THE NEW ARCADIA.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 15 September, p. 8. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article135769991  

1896, September 16. “The New Arcadia,” Operetta. The promoters of the entertainment given last evening in the Town Hall, in the shape of a locally-written and locally composed operetta, are to be congratulated on a most signal success. Success was deserved, for the performance presented to the crowded audience an outcome of patient training, assiduous practice on the part of singers, dancers, and orchestra, skill and taste in dressing; and experienced stage management. The work of Mr. Squire has already been referred to in our columns. It is  fit that we should here note its manifest literary excellence. There are though, the fruit of reading, and philosophy in it, in addition to wit, sparkle, and humour. Also there is local colour, poetry in the pretty songs which stud the page, and strength in the blank verse dislogue. Mr. King proved a worthy co-labourer. The music echoes the note of the words, repeats their varied tones, and helps in their interpretation. We do not know that we can better express our opinion of libretto and music than by saying that, satisfactory as was their exposition last evening, the performers being amateurs and children, they deserve to be rendered by adults, professional actors and vocalists, who as exponents would bring out fully the meaning and feeling of the words and the music. We are happy to be able to say that both writer and composer were called before the curtain at the close of a performance punctuated from time to time by hearty applause, and followed with interest and attention from opening to close. In fact, the Maitland public recognised the merit of the work of a resident author and resident composer, in this way, as well as in the substantial manner indicated by the greatness of the audience.

The story of the New Arcadia, presented again in brief, is this: A number of young women, under the control of their Queen Agatha, week the seclusion of the Australian bush, to live in maiden innocence, and in pursuit of learning, apart from the distractions of the world and secure against the disturbances generated in the female breast by the presence of man. The only male creature admitted to their intimacy is Menos, a deformed scholar, whose repellent exterior has earned him the post of guide, philosopher and friend. For Queen Agatha sagely thinks none of her fair associates will fall in love with him. But he possesses the heart of a man, if his outward guise be thought that of a monster. And he loves Agatha, who eventually accepts his suit, though one of the incidents of the little play is the offer of Menos’ hand to Agatha and her rejection of it. This occurs after he has heard her confess that her professed love of solitude and hatred of man are pretended out of desire for notoriety. And with the surrender of their Queen comes the return to society of the Arcadians, who are convinced by Menos’ argument that the noble life is that which is lived with others for others – an unexceptionable moral, incidentally and naturally introduced, and not too rudely insisted upon. Mr. Squire has wisely avoided making moreal teaching too obvious in a work the characteristic of which is airy and graceful lightness.

The principal parts in the operetta were borne by Miss Ellen Alms (Queen Agatha), Miss Ross (Charmion), Miss Sealy (Leoconae), Mr. W.A. Squire (Menos). The chorus included eighty young ladies, and the instrumental music was rendered by an orchestra of fifteen members, of whom Mr. Alexander was leader. Mr. Vial, as an act of grace, with a desire to strengthen the string part of the orchestra, played second violin. The orchestra proved a valuable aid to the success of the performance. Mr. E.M. Bach-King was at the piano, and Mr. G.F. King conducted. The stage arrangements were in the capable hands of Mr. George Kedwell and Mr. Squire, and the dances and march were arranged by Miss Lily Wright. in the part of the Queen, Miss Ellen Alma was well suited: she sang Mr. King’s music with intelligent comprehension of its meaning, and displayed very fair acting ability. She was heard throughout to advantage, but her best effort was “The Singer,” for which she was vociferously recalled. The quality of intelligence was conspicuous also in the renderings of Miss Ross and Miss Sealy – they read their parts well, as well as sang them well. Miss Sealy’s solo, “My childhood’s home,” was highly acceptable, and her pure voice is well fitted to the theme. Some of the most pleasing of the vocal work was done in duets between Agatha and Menos, Mr. Squire played the part he had himself created with his accustomed fidelity, and was very effective indeed in the final love-scene, where he has several sweetly poetic blank verse lines to speak. The various choruses were sung with spirit, sweetness, and precision. In our previous reference to the operetta, we mentioned the Slumber Song as its gem for both words and music, and we fancy most of the audience were last night of our opinion. The picture with which it concluded constituted one of the most charming tableaux of the operetta. The March of the Nations proved, as was expected, highly attractive: the varied colouring of the dresses and the flags pleased the eyes of the spectators, while lively and appropriate music delighted their ears. The whole of the arrangements in connections with this pretty interlude introducing the nations were indeed admirable, and the obeisance of the nations to Australia a most graceful and picturesque adjustment. Two dances were introduced, – one a gipsy dance, and the other a skirt or Spanish dance, and both elicited loud applause. The last named dance so well pleased the house that a repeat was demanded. All the dresses exhibited the pains-taken with them, and many of them were rich and striking. Incidental allusion has been made to some of the groupings, and we may add that they were all highly commendable. So likewise was the decoration of the stage to represent a ferny glen. As has been intimated, painstaking industry was devoted to this production, and it is entirely gratifying to all concerned that their efforts were so liberally recognised by the generous patronage of the public. Considerable difficulty was expressed in seating all who presented themselves and had not reserved seats. Therefore under the impressions that many persons will gladly witness a second representation and that many others failed to gain admission last night, the promoters have determined to repeat the operetta to-morrow evening.

Ref: 1896 ‘”The New Arcadia,” Operetta.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 16 September, p. 2. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123772887

 

1896, September 16. Maitland District. (FROM OUR SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE) “THE NEW ARCADIA.” AT the Town Hall, West Maitland, last evening, the operetta “The New Arcadia” was presented to a crowded and enthusiastic audience. The work is from the combined pens of Mr. W. A. Squire and Mr. G. F. King, A. R. C. O., the former having written the libretto, and the latter having composed the music. The fact of the operetta being locally written and the production being the initial one, added to that of the performance being sustained entirely by ladies and gentlemen resident in the Newcastle and Maitland districts, enhanced the interest of the presentation. But apart from the attraction arising from these sources the work merited the fullest appreciation of the audience, and it is safe to assert that the opera has successfully passed through the ordeal of stage launching and has unfurled its sails with the prospect of being pleasantly propelled on the sea of public opinion to a wider sphere of usefulness and attraction than the surroundings of a country town can offer. As a literary effort the work is entitled to occupy a prominent position. It displays considerable natural ability, indicates a great deal of study, and exhibit the skill of the trained dramatic writer. There is a crispness, a rippling sparkle, contained in the lines which is in entire keeping with the conditions of our own country, the inborn freedom, the rhythmic glow, and the piquant buoyancy giving a charming delineation of one of the strongest characteristics of life in Australia. The composition is light, essentially so, and it is perfectly clear that the author wrote with such an intention otherwise he would have chosen different themes, and fixed his plot under other conditions. The intention was undoubtedly to produce a series of bright situations giving practically unlimited scope for artistic effects, and to place an operetta before the public which should delight the eye and steep the senses in a mirthful atmosphere unclouded by tragedy and untainted by vulgarity. While exhibiting a joyous simplicity, the work bears a pretty moral which becomes patent to all as the closing scenes approach. From what has been said it will be readily understood that the verses are good; that the dialogue is bright and forcible, and that the various incidents and scenes dovetail cleverly. A corresponding amount of study is displayed in the musical setting. Mr. King has entered fully into the task undertaken by him, and has succeeded admirably in conveying in the music what, his colleague depicts in the lines. Perhaps the most artistic portion of the setting is the solo of the prima donna “The Singer.” This is followed in point of excellence by the “Australian Pastoral” and the Slumber Chorus. The latter item is fashioned much on the lines of Gounod’s Serenade and the “Hush, Hush, Come Gentle Sleep,” is sweetly pictured. “The Chorus of Nations,” “The Grand National March,” and Australasia’s Welcome,” are among the leading choruses, while the closing number, “Away, Away,” is calculated to cement the good impression awakened by the other vocal items. The Spanish dance forms a pretty movement, and in last night’s performance was excellently sustained. The opening scene displays an Australian glen in which a number of nymphs have congregated around Agatha, their queen, with the professed intention of living a woodland life and of existing free from the influence of the male tyrant – if they can – also of acquiring wisdom under the tuition of Menos, a deformed individual whose presence they deem necessary for the advancement of their studies. After a series of forest gambols and scenes one of the Arcadians is lulled to rest by the strains of the slumber song, and Menos also falls asleep under the influence of the music. The Queen then appears, and in recitative expresses a feeling of discontent with the forest life and a belief that men are not all bad. Menos awakes, and, hearing the utterance of the Queen, tells her that she has stolen his heart. Agatha partly repels him, and he promises to keep secret her want of regard for the rustic life. He again urges his suit, however, and overcomes the wavering reluctance of Agatha, who accepts him, much to the surprise of the other Arcadians, who decide to abandon the woodland existence and return to their homes. Then come the departures from the forest dells and the tableau. Miss Ellen Alma appeared as the Queen, and sustained the part excellently. Her singing was good, and her presence graceful. The lady was accorded a well-deserved encore for her rendering of “The Singer.” Miss Ross appeared as Charmion, and Miss Sealy as Leoconae. Both exhibited care and promise of dramatic skill, their voices being well displayed. Twenty-two nations were represented, and 16 young ladies appeared in the Spanish and rustic dances. The costumes were rich and appropriate, the effect in several of the scenes being gorgeous. Mr. W. A. Squire impersonated Menos, and carried out the representation in a thoroughly realistic and satisfactory manner. There were 65 young ladies on the stage for the choruses, but the volume of the music and the effect of the performance was increased by an auxiliary chorus of 25 voices. The singing was vigorous and harmonious. The orchestra consisted of 15 performers, and the music was well balanced and evenly blended. Mr. Alexander led the orchestra, and Mr. E. M. B. King presided at the piano. Mr. Vial played second violin in order to strengthen the strings. The operetta was given in aid of the Girls’ High School fund, and the ladies who undertook the training of the girls had every reason to be pleased with the result. Mr. G. F. King was the conductor, and his duties were performed in a manner that merits the highest commendation. Messrs. G. Kedwell and W. A. Squire had the entire stage management, which could not have been carried out with better results. The performance was so successful that in response to urgent solicitations it was resolved to repeat it in the Town Hall to-morrow (Thursday) evening. Ref: 1896 ‘Maitland District.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 16 September, p. 8. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article135766297  

 

1896, September 17. THE NEW ARCADIA. By advertisement in this issue it will be observed that Messrs. W. A. Squire and G. F. King, A.R.C.O., have decided to give another performance of the operetta, “The New Arcadia,” at the Town Hall, West Maitland, to-night. The production of the work last Tuesday evening attracted so many people from the district that a large number of the public were unable to gain admittance. The audience were so delighted with the operetta that the majority will hail the reproduction with great pleasure, and a full house may be confidently anticipated. The performance should be even more successful than that of Tuesday night, as the performers have had the advantage of a valuable experience and of further rehearsals. Seats may be reserved upon application at Mr. W. T. Poulton’s book arcade. Ref: 1896 ‘THE NEW ARCADIA.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 17 September, p. 8. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article135777017

 

1896, September 18. “THE NEW ARCADIA.” The operetta, “The New Arcadia,” was reproduced in the Town Hall, West Maitland, last evening, in the presence of a fair audience as regarded numbers. The performers appeared to even greater advantage than at the opening production on Tuesday night, the principals sang with increased brilliancy, the choruses were rendered with greater spirit, and the dialogue was given with added fluency. The orchestral portion was excellent, the light and shade of the music being well displayed. Misses Alma Boss and Seally were rewarded with handsome baskets of flowers, and the former was imperatively encored on one occasion. The Spanish dance was splendidly sustained, and the youthful performers were compelled to reappear. Messrs. W. A. Squire and G.F. King have every reason to feel proud of their work, and to expect that it will win them additional laurels. Ref: 1896 ‘”THE NEW ARCADIA.”‘, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 18 September, p. 8. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article135769683  

 

1896, September 18. LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS. “THE NEW ARCADIA.” – The original operetta named as above, the libretto of which is from the pen of Mr. W. A. Squire and the music by Mr. Geo. F. King, A.R.C.O., both local gentlemen, was repeated in the Town Hall last evening with much acceptance. There was a large attendance. The singing and speaking of the principals was much relished, while the choruses went with a liveliness and enthusiasm that worn inspiring. The dancing and grouping of tho numerous and tastily-attired chorus was much admired. At tho conclusion of the quartette, the three ladies were each presented with a handsome basket of flowers. Miss Alma was compelled to repeat the last verse of her song “The Singer,” the audience not being satisfied with a bowing acknowledgment. The arrangements ran smoothly all through, and all connected with the production are to be congratulated on the result. The funds of the Public High School for Girls, to be devoted, we understand to the purchase of a library, will be materially benefited. Ref: 1896 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 18 September, p. 2. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123783799  

1896, September 19. “The New Arcadia,” Operetta. Ref: 1896 ‘”The New Arcadia,” Operetta.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 19 September, p. 3. , viewed 22 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132405587

 

1896, 17 December. W.S. Squire recited at event at Newcastle Collegiate School. Ref: 1896 ‘NEWCASTLE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 18 December, p. 5. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article135770451

 

1897, January 6. Farewell to Messrs. Hubert Hill and W.A. Squire. Meeting of the friends was held at Captain Holden’s Exchange Hotel on Wednesday evening. “Mr. Kedwell explained that the boat in which Mr. Squire had taken passage for South Africa would sail on the 29th instant, and Mr. Hill, who had altered his mind, was going to ‘West Australia, and would be leaving on the 28th. Mr. Squire would probably leave town on the 23rd or 24th. “ …” Mr. Squire has distinguished himself indeed as much by literary work of various kinds as by services on the stage and concert platform, and his writingsas a dramatist and a seeker for truth about Australian myths have conferred honour on the scene of their production, as well as upon the author.”

Ref: 1897 ‘Farewell to Messrs. Hubert Hill and W. A. Squire.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 9 January, p. 4. , viewed 24 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126324426

 

1897, January 16. Sale of Household Furniture, AT RIVERVIEW HOUSE, SEMPILL-STEEET, SATURDAY, 16th INST., AT TWO O’CLOCK.

O.K. YOUNG has received instructions from Mr. W. A. Squire to sell by auction at Riverview House, Sempill-Street, on Saturday, 16th of January, 1897, at Two o’clock,

A QUANTITY HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, Consisting of — DOUBLE and SINGLE BEDSTEADS, Wire Mattresses, Sideboard with glass back, Chest Drawers,. Washstands and Ware, Austrian Sofa, Brussels Carpet and Oilcloth, Mirror, two Inlaid Folding Chairs, two Carpet ditto, Wardrobe with bevelled glass, Marble Topped Washstand and Dressing Table with Glass, Looking Glass, two Book Cases, Desk, Office Chair, Fender and Irons, Lamp, Pictures, Large Marble Clock.

All the Furniture is in first-class condition. Terms cash. 063 Ref: 1897 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 16 January, p. 8. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126324170

 

1897, January 18. THE SQUIRE-HILL COMPLIMENTARY ENTERTAINMENT. – In another column will be found the full programme to be presented at the complimentary entertainment to be tendered to Messrs W.A. Squire and Hubert C. Hill on their departure from West Maitland. Details of performers follow including W.A. Squire performing as Tom Conyers in the . Ref: 1897 ‘No title’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 18 January, p. 5. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123776503 and advertisement : 1897 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 18 January, p. 1. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123776520

 

1897, January 19. SOCIAL TO MESSRS. SQUIRE AND HILL. Review of last night’s social. Ref: 1897 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 19 January, p. 2. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123771984 and 1897 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 20 January, p. 2. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123785273

 

1897, January 20. The Squire-Hill Farewall. 1897 ‘THE SQUIRE-HILL FAREWALL.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 20 January, p. 8. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136559791

 

1897, January 21. At his farewell at the Maitland Town Hall, on Thursday evening 21 January 1897, after he had received his thirteen sovereigns, illuminated address created by artist Mr William Tracey, and parting words from his colleagues on the Maitland Scientific Society, “deeply affected”  he said:

there was much he would like to say, but he was afraid there was very little opportunity for it. “There were times,” he said, “when the lips will speak more than the heart will endorse, but there are other times when the lips will not utter what the heart would express. With me, my desire to speak is lesser in degree than my emotion at the cause which calls for my reply to the kindest yet most painful words it has ever been my fortune or mischance to hear. Kind, because they wish me every benefit my endeavours can procure, and even more; painful because they are words of parting. Do not think gentlemen that any regret you may feel does not find its echo in my heart – the regret and pain I feel is ten times yours: you are losing one friend. I am losing many. I have more friends in this town than I anticipate ever making again in the same length of time. I arrived in Maitland a perfect stranger, acquainted with no one bearing one letter of introduction, and that from my late friend Leslie Hughes to his family, and to-day I leave town without one person wishing me ill-will (Applause.) Of this fact I am as proud as Caesar when upon the Lupercal he was offered a kindly crown. ‘Kind Hearts are more than coronets,’ and few upon a critical occasion required them more and few had more kind hearts and soothing hands, watchful eyes and gently words at their command. As I leave all with the deepest regret it would be ill-taste for me to individualise. I see around me old and new friends, and the new have not taken the place of the old. For your kindness, for your good wishes, for your disinterested efforts of me and mine, I return you a wealth of thanks by no means commensurate with the kindnesses you have bestowed.” In conclusion he said that he left Maitland with the deepest regret, and though it had not been very kind to him in the way of floods, in the way of heats he would remember Maitland and Maitland people all his life. He thanked them for their hearty farewells, and said from the bottom of his heart, “Thank you, gentlemen, and good-bye.” (Applause). – 1897 ‘Farewell Addresses to Messrs. Squire and Hill.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 23 January, p. 2. , viewed 22 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123770515

 

1897, January 22. Squire-Hill Farewell. At the Town Hall, West Maitland, a special musical performance was held last night (i.e., 21 January 1897) and three selections were performed from Mr G. F. King’s operetta “The New Arcadia” including “March of Nations” and two others. Ref: 1897 ‘SQUIRE-HILL FAREWELL.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 22 January, p. 8. , viewed 24 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136553770

 

1897, January 23. STILL THEY GO. WEST MAITLAND Friday. A grand musical and dramatic entertainment was tendered on Wednesday evening In the Town Hall to Messrs. W. A. Squire and Hubert Hill, two well-known and popular Maitlanders, who are leaving for South Africa and West Australia, respectively. The large hall was crowded, and many were unable to gain admission. Mr. Squire regrets leaving Maitland, but is forced to go to some country where native industry is protected: and encouraged. He came to Maitland a rank free-trader, and leaves it an ardent protectionist. Ref: 1897 ‘STILL THEY GO.’, The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), 23 January, p. 6. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227198389

 

1897, January 26. FAREWELL TO A MAITLAND MAN. WEST MAITLAND, Monday. Mr. W. A. Squire, who left Maitland on Saturday for South Africa, was entertained on the previous evening at the Exchange Hotel by a number of citizens, presided over by the Mayor, Alderman Crothers. Mr. Squire is well known by his able contributions concerning the ethnology of the Australian aborigines. His last work, entitled “Ritual, Myth and Customs of the Australian Aborigines,” was favourably reviewed in the “Star” when it first appeared. Mr. Squire has also contributed verse and prose to the press. Ref: 1897 ‘FAREWELL TO A MAITLAND MAN.’, The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), 26 January, p. 3. , viewed 24 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article227203822

 

1897, January.  He relocated to Natal, South Africa.

 

1897, April 10. Mr. W. A. Squire on Cape Town. Mr Squire reached Cape Town on February 27. He writes about it. He has secured a job at the Standard Bank of Africa (Ltd.) Ref: 1897 ‘Mr. W. A. Squire on Cape Town,’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 10 April, p. 4. , viewed 24 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article122726110

 

1897, April 17. Mr. W. A. Squire on Cape Town. Same as above. Ref: 1897 ‘Mr. W. A. Squire on Cape Town.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 17 April, p. 12. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126326863

 

1897, April 18. Mr. W.A. Squire – An article on “Rinderpest in South Africa” appears in the last number of the Stock and Station Journal, under the name of Mr. W.A. Squire, who writes from Durban (Natal) on April 18. Ref: 1897 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 10 June, p. 2. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article122725228

 

1897, June 23. The Natal Mercury of June 23 is to hand, and contains an excellent four column sketch of the Record Reign celebrations at Durban from the pen of Mr. W. A. Squire, now residing in that city. Mr Squire is a son-in-law of Mr. Turnbull, mine manager for the A.A. Company, and is well known in Newcastle and Maitland, having resided at the latter town for some years. Ref: 1897 ‘CURRENT EVENTS.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 2 August, p. 4. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article134879879

 

1897, August 2. The Natal Mercury of June 23 is to hand, and contains an excellent four column sketch of the Record Reign celebrations at Durban from the pen of Mr. W. A. Squire, now residing in that city. Mr Squire is a son-in-law of Mr. Turnbull, mine manager for the A.A. Company, and is well known in Newcastle and Maitland, having resided at the latter town for some years. Ref: 1897 ‘CURRENT EVENTS.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 2 August, p. 4. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article134879879

 

1897, October 19. At a meeting of Australians held at Durban (South Africa) recently, it was decided to form the Australasian Cricket Club, and W. A. Squire, well and favourably known in musical and social circle in West Maitland, but who deserted us about twelve months ago, was chosen as treasurer. Ref: 1897 ‘No title’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 19 October, p. 6. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article122725919

 

1897, December 14. Maitland District, – (From OUR SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE.) MR. W. A. SQUIRE, The friends of Mr. W. A. Squire, who left Maitland for South Africa a few years ago, will learn with pleasure that he is doing well in Durban as principal in the firm of Squire, Mitchell and Co., Australian provision merchants. He says that things are in a very bad way in South Africa, and that Maitland is a hundred times a better place to live in than any town in that country. He has travelled considerably since his arrival in Cape Town, and has been right through all of the South African States. Although matters South African are in a very bad way, hopes are entertained that things will soon be booming. Ref: 1897 ‘Maitland District.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 14 December, p. 8. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136275843

 

1897, December 16. Australian Bee Appliances in South Africa.

— Some few months ago, with a view of extending their business in the manufacture of apicultural appliances, Messrs. Pender Brothers, of West Maitland, forwarded a consignment to Mr. W. A. Squire, who some months previously had left West Maitland, and is now located at Durban, South Africa. On their arrival Mr. Squire entered them in competition at the Durban and Coast Agricultural annual show, and with most successful results, he informing them that in a keen competition they had been awarded first prize for an “Exhibit of Australian Beehives.” By the last mail, Messrs, Pender received the certificate and silver medal which were awarded them, which we have had the pleasure of seeing. The certificate is enclosed in a neat border, and contains the name of the society and certifies that the prize has been awarded. The medal is about the size of a five shilling piece, and has a raised rim, inside which are the words, “Durban and Coast Society Agriculture and Industry.” A wreath of native flowers encloses the inscription –  “Pender Brothers, for Australian Beehives, first prize, 1897.” On the reverse of the medal is a very neatly executed Royal Arms, the ribbon from which forms another border enclosing a couple of Cape buffaloes which is apparently the emblem of the Society, as they also appear in the certificate. The medal and certificate will be exhibited in one of the windows of Messrs Wolfe, Prentice and Co., on Saturday. The above speaks well for the class of goods put out by Pender Bros. by the aid of their complete machinery. They are able to compete both in quality and price, not only with Australian manufacturers, but also with those of the outside world. As a result of the above exhibit, the firm are now completing an order for South Africa, and notwithstanding the high tariffs of the other colonies, they are now completing orders for South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia, and Tasmania. Ref: 1897 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 16 December, p. 2. , viewed 29 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article122733780  and 1897 ‘Advertising’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 25 December, p. 9. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126328009

 

1899, April 8. News of an Old Friend. — We have received a short letter from Mr. W. A. Squire, who writes from Durban, Natal, South Africa, in which he says matters are going favourably with him, a piece of news which Mr. Squire’s many Maitland friends will receive with pleasure. Mr. Squire encloses a cutting from a Maitland Mercury of 1862 which he has come across in Durban. How the paper got there he does not know : some Australian probably took it across with him. The cutting is from the poetry corner and contains some original verse West Maitland, addressed “To – “ and beginning “I think of thee in the silent night.” The initials are those of John Vincent Dowling, frequently then and subsequently contributor to these columns, though he seldom “dropped into poetry.” Ref: 1899 ‘Local news of the Week.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 8 April, p. 4. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133600580

 

1899, April 15. Mrs W.A. Squire and Miss Squire are booked by the Aberdeen White Star liner Moravian, which sailed from Dalgety’s Wharf at noon for London and Cape Town via ports. Ref: 1899 ‘SHIPPING.’, The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), 14 April, p. 7. , viewed 29 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article236793710  Eventually set sail on the 19 April 1899 see: 1899 ‘SHIPPING.’, Leader (Melbourne, Vic. : 1862 – 1918), 22 April, p. 13. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article196512280

 

1899, June 3. “THE NATAL BULLETIN.” – We received the third number of The Natal Bulletin, of which we see Mr. W. A. Squire, late of West Maitland, is editor. The Bulletin is a lively weekly newspaper containing crisp articles commenting on affairs, dramatic and literary notices, an illustrated page, sporting news, society items, and jocularities. The Bulletin is published at Durban, and its appearance and the character of its contents do credit to our old friend, who we are glad to know, has entered a profession for which he had a predilection, and in which he is competent to shine. Ref: 1899 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 3 July, p. 2. , viewed 29 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126338105 and 1899 ‘Local News of the Week.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 8 July, p. 4. , viewed 29 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133596672

 

1899, November 21. Mr W. A. Squire, formerly of West Maitland, writes from Durban, Natal, 21st November, as follows. Ref: 1899 ‘NEWS FROM NATAL.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 28 December, p. 5. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article135380379

 

1900, January 13. An interesting “diary from within” of the siege of Ladismith, from the pen of our Natal correspondent, is published In page 2. It is followed by comment on and criticism of the war by “The Man in the Street,” Mr. W. A. Squire, formerly of West Maitland. Ref: 1900 ‘The Boer War.’,Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 13 January, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133212190 and 1900 ‘NOTES FROM DURBAN.’, “THE MAN IN THE STREET ON THE WAR.” Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 13 January, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133212182

 

1900, January 29. The South African War. Notes from Durban. Our correspondent in Natal, Mr. W.A. Squire, formerly of Maitland, writes as follows, under date 17th December… Ref: 1900 ‘The South African War.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 29 January, p. 3. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133211024

 

1900, January 30. Chieveley Camp. (By Our Correspondent, Mr. W.A. Squires.) Ref: 1900 ‘CHIEVELEY CAMP.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 30 January, p. 4. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133218705

 

1900, February 6. (From Our Correspondent, Mr. W.A. Squire, late of West Maitland.)  Ref: 1900 ‘THE WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 6 February, p. 5. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133212581

 

1900, February 24. W.A. Squire The Special Correspondent. Comical Verse. Ref: 1900 ‘THE SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.’, Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), 24 February, p. 2. (EVENING NEWS SUPPLEMENT), viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article117034685

 

1900, March 2. Before Ladismith. The Battle of Colenso. Camp Amusements. He Forgot the Countersign. Australians at the Front. Ref: 1900 ‘BEFORE LADISMITH.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 2 March, p. 7. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133212130

 

1900, March 16. In Page 6 of this issue is published a graphic account by our correspondence with General Buller’s force in Natal (Mr. W.A. Squire) Ref: 1900 ‘NEWS FROM THE FRONT.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 16 March, p. 4. , viewed 24 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133221095

 

1900, March 16.  The account by W. A. Squire. Ref: 1900 ‘With General Buller’s Force.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 16 March, p. 6. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133221148

 

1900, April 6. Our (“Natal Mercury”) Special Correspondent (Mr W.A. Squire) has arrived from Colenso and Ladysmith and furnishes the following full description of the decisive victory over the Boers and the relief of Ladysmith. Ref: 1900 ‘THE BATTLE OF PIETERS.’, The Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 – 1954), 6 April, p. 3. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article241248369

 

1900, April 7. With Buller’s Force.  To the Relief of  Ladysmith. The Advance from Hussar Hill. Mr. W.A. Squire writes. Ref: 1900 ‘WITE BULLER’S FORCE.’, Singleton Argus (NSW : 1880 – 1954), 7 April, p. 8. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article78887068

 

1900, April 7. (From Our Correspondent, Mr. W.A. Squire, late of West Maitland.)  Ref: 1900 ‘With Buller’s Force Before Ladismith.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 7 April, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133211211

 

1900, April 12. The Battle of Pieters. Irish Heroism. Ref: 1900 ‘THE BATTLE OF PIETERS.’, The Broadford Courier and Reedy Creek Times (Broadford, Vic. : 1893 – 1916), 12 April, p. 5. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58919995 and 1900 ‘THE BATTLE OF PIETERS.’, West Gippsland Gazette (Warragul, Vic. : 1898 – 1930), 24 April, p. 5. (MORNING.), viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article68698858 and related highest prices:  1900 ‘The Seige of Ladysmith.’, Bowral Free Press and Berrima District Intelligencer (NSW : 1884 – 1901), 25 April, p. 3. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124509207 and 1900 ‘The Siege of Ladysmith.’, Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal (NSW : 1851 – 1904), 25 April, p. 3. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63875953 and 1900 ‘OHE SIEGE OF LADY-SMITH.’, Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), 25 April, p. 6. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113717122 and 1900 ‘The Siege of Ladysmith.’, Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 – 1907), 28 April, p. 20. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71379800   and 1900 ‘The Siege of Ladysmith.’, The Blayney Advocate and Carcoar Herald (NSW : 1898 – 1904), 5 May, p. 4. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article144289469 and 1900 ‘Advertising’, The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), 5 May, p. 3. , viewed 28 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229362412

 

1900, April 24. Our (“Natal Mercury”) Special Correspondent (Mr W.A. Squire) has arrived from Colenso and Ladysmith and furnishes the following full description of the decisive victory over the Boers and the relief of Ladysmith. Ref: 1900 ‘THE BATTLE OF PIETERS.’, West Gippsland Gazette (Warragul, Vic. : 1898 – 1930), 24 April, p. 5. (MORNING.), viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article68698858

 

1900, May 5. The Special Correspondent (Comical Verse). The following lines are from the pen of our “Special Correspondent at the Front,” Mr. W.A. Squire, late of West Maitland. Ref: 1900 ‘THE SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 5 May, p. 6. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136477461

 

1900, May 11. NEWS OF A NOTED MAITLANDER. – Mr. C. E. Norrie of Messrs Norrie and Lindsay, West Mitland, has sent us the following extract from a letter received by him from Mr. W.A. Squire, dated Brooks Farm, Ladysmith, Natal, May 11.; “As you mention, I am at the front, and have been so, acting as war correspondent for the Natal Mercury and Daily News, London, since December 13. I was among the first at the relief of Ladysmith, and am quite hardened to the splendid hardships of campaigning. I am going right through to Pretoria today.” Mr Squire’s many friends in Maitland will be glad to hear about him. Ref: 1900 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 21 June, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132878182 and 1900 ‘Local News of the Week.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 23 June, p. 5. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article127542962

 

1900, June 22. Ref: 1900 ‘With Buller’s Force in Natal.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 22 June, p. 6. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136473688

 

1900, August 2. (From Our Correspondent, Mr. W.A. Squire, late of West Maitland.) Ref: 1900 ‘The South African Campaign’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 2 August, p. 6. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136474138

 

1900, August 3. With Buller in Natal. Ref: 1900 ‘WITH BULLER IN NATAL.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 3 August, p. 5. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136476715  and 1900 ‘The South African Campaign.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 3 August, p. 7. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136476768 and 1900 ‘With Buller’s Column in the Transvaal.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 6 August, p. 5. , viewed 28 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136483011

 

1900, October 17. “Writing from Pietermaritzburg, on August 20th last, Mr. W. A. Squire, whose interesting letters from tile seat of war in South Africa recently ran through the columns of the “‘Newcastle Morning Herald,” states that “I am at present acting as city representative of the “Natal Mercury”at this place, where I have opened an office, and am well pleased with the result. However, I have had nearly four years of this country now, and, like all Australians, am beginning to turn my eyes towards the land of the great drought and small bandicoot. I am pleased to say that I went through the campaign as far as Standerton without turning a hair. I had many close escapes from shells and other material, also a very hard time on the Drachenberg without tents, but with a good supply of ice. The experience built up my constitution. I keep closely in touch with Newcastle’s affairs, and hope you will not have trouble of any kind in your coal trade.” Ref: 1900 ‘CURRENT NEWS.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 17 October, p. 4. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article136235045

 

1901, May 20. An Australasian Commonwealth Association in South Africa. Ref: 1901 ‘AN AUSTRALASIAN COMMONWEALTH ASSOCIATION.’, The Brisbane Courier (Qld. : 1864 – 1933), 20 May, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article19087226 and 1901 ‘AN AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH ASSOCIATION.’, The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 – 1939), 25 May, p. 1018. , viewed 28 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article21262668

 

 

1902, July 23. “Regrets” from the Operetta by W.A. Squire and G.F. King performed by The Maitland Male Voice Society at their Seventh Concert of the West Maitland Town Hall. Ref: 1902 ‘The Maitland Male Voice Society.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 24 July, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article123452704  and 1902 ‘The Maitland Male Voice Society’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 26 July, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126600561

 

1903, February 16. By the last mail we received from South Africa a New Year’s card from the literary staff of “The Times,” of Natal, bearing a photograph showing a group of native constabulary. The paper which is published in Maritzburg, Natal, South Africa, is now under the business management of Mr. W. A. Squire, formerly of West Maitland, and- son-in-law of Mr. Turnbull, of the A. A. Co. Ref: 1903 ‘CURRENT NEWS’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 16 February, p. 4. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133356736

 

1904, April 11. W.A. Squire and Rita Squire among welcomers of  Miss Ada Crossley at Maritzburg. Ref: 1904 ‘Miss Ada Crossley at Maritzburg.’, The McIvor Times and Rodney Advertiser (Heathcote, Vic. : 1863 – 1918), 28 April, p. 3. (EVENING), viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87329284

 

1904, April 23. Australophohia in South Africa! Ref: 1904 ‘Australophobia in South Africa.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 23 April, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124041933   and “The following article, taken from the “Times of Natal,” of March 16, is from the pen of Mr. W. A. Squires, late of Maitland, and will be read with interest.” Ref: 1904 ‘Australophobia in South Africa’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 30 April, p. 9. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article125099344

 

1904, October 6. “Mr. W. A. Squire. — We have a copy of “The Times of Natal,” published at Pietermaritzburg, which contains a full report of the lecture on ‘Prehistoric Art,’ by Mr. W. A. Squire, once of West Maitland. Mr. Squire has made a careful study of his subject all his life, and many of his illustrations were derived from Australian aboriginal drawings.” Ref: 1904 ‘LOCAL AND GENERAL.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 6 October, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124053915 and 1904 ‘Local news of the Week.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 8 October, p. 4. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article125104147

 

1904, October 20. At the Japanese Fair at the Maitland Town Hall “Between the Produce and Kitchen Stalls there is the Book Stall (Houya)-, where Mr. W. A. Squires has a large quantity of second-hand reading matter for sale.” Ref: 1904 ‘THE JAPANESE FAIR.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 20 October, p. 2. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124038348

 

1906, July 5. News received from Natal of death of Mr John Bewick Turnbull, father in law of W.A. Squire. Sub manager for A.A. Co. mines at Newcastle. In 1891 opened Lithgow mines, in 1895 took charge of Seaham colliery. Then went to South Africa, managing mines in the Transvaal. In 1904 went to Madagascar, involved in mining floatations in Majuga district. Deceased leaves widow, a son, a daughter (wife of W.A. Squires), and a sister, all residing in Maritzburg. Ref: 1906 ‘Death of Mr. J. B. Turnbull.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 5 July, p. 2. , viewed 24 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article122703222  and 1906 ‘LOCAL NEWS.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 7 July, p. 4. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126625604

 

1906, July 10. Natal and its Natives. Mr W.A. Squire discusses the Kaffir. Ref: 1906 ‘NATAL AND ITS NATIVES.’, Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 – 1931), 10 July, p. 5. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114094670

 

In 1907, his second daughter, Viva Bewick Squire, was born.

 

1907, December 21 (Saturday). Mr. W. A. Squire, who for the last eleven years has been engaged in journalistic work in South Africa, returned to Sydney last Saturday. Prior to proceeding to South Africa Mr. Squire resided with his wife and daughter in West Maitland. Mrs. Squire, who has been visiting the old country, will leave England for Sydney on the 18th proximo. Mrs. Squire is the elder daughter of the late Mr. Turnbull, and spent her earlier years at Newcastle. Ref: 1907 ‘CURRENT NEWS.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 24 December, p. 4. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article134694868

 

1907, December 24. Mr. W. A. Squire. Mr. W. A. Squire, who for the last eleven years has been engaged in journalistic work in South Africa, returned to Sydney last Saturday. Prior to proceeding to South Africa, Mr. Squire resided with his wife and daughter in West Maitland. Mrs. Squire, who has been visiting the old country, will leave England for Sydney on the 18th proximo. Ref: 1907 ‘Mr. W. A. Squire.’, The Maitland Daily Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1939), 24 December, p. 4. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124432729  and 1907 ‘LOCAL NEWS.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 28 December, p. 4. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126784457

 

1908, January 2. Ref: 1908 ‘THE PERIL IN NATAL.’, The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), 2 January, p. 7. , viewed 28 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article238104508

 

1908, January 9. Ref: 1908 ‘THE PERIL IN NATAL’, Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 – 1954), 9 January, p. 6. (DAILY), viewed 28 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38170892

 

1908, January 11. Ref: 1908 ‘THE PERIL IN NATAL.’, Clarence and Richmond Examiner (Grafton, NSW : 1889 – 1915), 11 January, p. 7. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article61544399

 

1908, January 11. (By W.A. Squire) Ref: 1908 ‘INDIANS IN SOUTH AFRICA.’, The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW : 1883 – 1930), 11 January, p. 4. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article238090678

 

1908, January 13. (By W.A. Squire in “The Daily Telegraph.”) Ref: 1908 ‘THE PERIL IN NATAL.’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 13 January, p. 8. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12697375  and 1908 ‘THE PERIL IN NATAL.’, Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 – 1954), 13 January, p. 5. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57930356

 

1908, January 18. (By W.A. Squire) Ref: 1908 ‘THE UNDESIRABLE ASIATIC’, The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), 18 January, p. 14. (LATE SPORTS), viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229926483

 

1908, January 20. (By W.A. Squire in “The Daily Telegraph.”) Ref: 1908 ‘INDIANS IN SOUTH AFRICA.’, The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), 20 January, p. 8. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12690277

 

1908, January 23.

SHOOTING FATALITY.

While proceeding: across the, A.A. Company’s paddock, near the Bar, about 4,30 yesterday afternoon, Thomas Grant, residing at 72 Parry-street, Newcastle, noticed the body of a middle-aged man lying in the sand,. Constable H. Roberts, stationed at Lake-road, was communicated with, and a closer examination of the body showed that death had apparently taken place some hours previously. In the right hand there was a small five-chambered revolver, containing three empty shells, one full cartridge, and one of the chambers was empty. Constable Roberts removed the body to the morgue.

The body is that of a well-dressed man, in good circumstances, of about 40 years of age, with dark hair, mingled with grey. He was 5ft 7in In height, and of medium build, clean shaven, with only a few teeth remaining in the upper jaw, He was wearing a dark hard hat and laceup boots. Among the articles found on the deceased was a card-case, bearing the initials, “W.A.S.,” also letters from relatives in America, Portions, of the linen bore the name of W. A. Squire, which is believed to establish the deceased’s identity. The matter has been reported to the District Coroner, Mr. C. Hibble, who has ordered a post mortem examination by the Government medical officer, Dr, John Harris. An inquest will be held at the Newcastle Courthouse at 10 o’clock this morning.

Ref: 1908 ‘SHOOTING FATALITY.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 23 January, p. 5. , viewed 28 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138402145

 

1908, January 23 (Thursday). Maitland Daily Mercury. Page 2 (http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124438584)

A man named Thomas Grant made a rather gruesome discovery in a paddock in the vicinity of the Lake Road yesterday (Wednesday 22 January 1908) afternoon. It was that of the body of a middle-aged man lying on the sand, with a small revolver tightly gripped in the right hand and a bullet wound disclosed the cause of death, which had apparently taken place some hours previously. The body is that of a well-dressed man, in good circumstances, of about 40 years of age, with dark hair, mingled with grey. He was about 5ft. 7in. in height, and of medium build, clean shaven, with only a few teeth remaining in the upper jaw. He was wearing a dark, hard hat, and lace-up boots. Among the articles found on the deceased was a card-case, bearing the initials “W.A.S.” also letters from relatives in Africa. Portions of the linen bore the name of W. A. Squire, which is believed to establish the deceased’s identity. The matter has been reported to the District Coroner. A pencilled note was found in a pocket, which reads as follows:- “I cannot write to Rita: this will break her heart. I ask Will to instruct her and strengthen her faith in the Christian religion. I killed myself. In Natal I cannot face my innocent wife and children. Mother, Nar, Rita, Viva, all forget my evil. Remember only my good.” On the reverse side were the words “Forgive me all, Will.” The name on one of the letters and handkerchiefs was W.A. Squire. Deceased’s mother apparently lives in America for a letter was found from his mother, Box 783, Lisbon, Col. Co., Ohio., U.S.A., dated October, 29, 1907.

 

1908, January 23 (Thursday). Argus p.4 (http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article10653380)

SUICIDE’S NOTE

SYDNEY, Wednesday – The body of a man, who had committed suicide by shooting, was found on the Merewether beach, Newcastle, this afternoon. In the right hand was a revolver, with three empty cartridge shells. Letters showed that the man was a recent arrival from South Africa. A blank cheque of the Natal Bank, Pietermaritzburg, was in the pocket. A pencilled note read – “I cannot write to Rita. This will break her heart, but strengthen her faith in the Christian religion. I killed myself in Natal. I cannot face my innocent wife and children and mother. Nar, Rita, Viva all forget my evil, remember only my good. Forgive me all.” The note was signed “Will ” and on one of the letters was the name W. A. Squire.

 

1908, January 23 (Thursday). Sydney Morning Herald. p.8 (http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138401173)

NEWCASTLE.

SUICIDE OF NATAL VISITOR.

NEWCASTLE, Wednesday.

A man was found lying dead in the A.A. Company’s paddock, near the “Bar,” at Merewether Beach, this afternoon, by a man named Thomas Grant. The body was lying face downwards In the sand, and in the right hand was a small five-chambered revolver, containing three empty shells and one loaded. The body was quite rigid, and Constable Russell conveyed it to the morgue.

According to the evidence of several letters and papers found in his pockets, deceased was a recent arrival from South Africa. His clothes were neat, and he seems to have been a man of very respectable appearance. In his pockets were found several letters, a card-case with the Initials W.A.S., and a box of cartridges. A visiting-card with the name H. E. Pratten was also found, and a blank cheque on the Natal Bank, Ltd., Pietermaritzburg. Deceased appeared to be a man of about 40 years, 5ft 7in In height, medium build, dark hair, and clean shaven. His jaw was very discoloured from the shot, which appeared to have entered his mouth.

A pencilled note was found in a pocket, which reads as follows:-

“I cannot write to Rita; this will break her heart. I ask Will to Instruct her and strengthen her faith In the Christian religion. I killed myself. In Natal I cannot face my innocent wife and children. Mother, Nar, Rita, Viva, all forget my evil. Remember only my good.”

On the reverse side were tho words “Forgive me all, Will.” The name on one of the letters and handkerchiefs was W. A. Squire.

Deceased’s mother apparently lives in America, for a letter was found from his mother. Box 783, Lisbon, Col. Co., Ohio, U.S.A., dated October 29, 1907.

The matter has been reported to tho district S.C. coronor, who will hold an inquest to-morrow.

Ref: 1908 ‘NEWCASTLE.’, The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954), 23 January, p. 8. , viewed 21 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article14939679)

 

1908, January 24. Australian Star p.7 (http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229927825)

SUICIDE ON MEREWETHER BEACH

SOUTH AFRICAN JOURNALIST.

NEWCASTLE, Thursday.

A man was found dead near Merewether Beach yesterday, with a revolver clasped in his hand. He has been identified W. A. Squire, who recently arrived from South Africa where he had been engaged in journalistic pursuits some, few years ago.

Deceased resided at Maitland, where he acted as a newspaper correspondent. His wife is now on her way from England, and he left a pathetic letter addressed to her, and his family. An inquest was opened today and adjourned until to-morrow.

(Ref: 1908 ‘SUICIDE ON MEREWETHER BEACH’, The Australian Star (Sydney, NSW : 1887 – 1909), 24 January, p. 7. (FIRST EDITION), viewed 21 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article229927825 )

 

Funeral Notice:

Family Notices (1908, January 24). Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), p. 6http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138401173. Retrieved January 30, 2018, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138401173

Grave is at Sandgate – https://crm.nmct.com.au//crm/CustomPages/OPMapDotNet/MapRenderV11.aspx?Longitude=151.707125&Latitude=-32.870810&Loca_LocationId=1234187&emailSMSMode=true&fullScreenMode=false&printMode=true&publicAccessMode=true&decSearchMode=true

 

1908, January 24. By W.A. Squire in “The Daily Telegraph.” Ref: 1908 ‘INDIANS IN SOUTH AFRICA.’, Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 – 1954), 24 January, p. 1. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article45045216

 

1908, January 25. (Saturday) Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate p. 6. (http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138393809)

THE LATE MR. W. A. SQUIRE.

News of the death under such distressing circumstances at Newcastle of Mr. W. A. Squire was received with deep regret by his many friends in Maitland, and more so by some who had seen him, apparently In good health and spirits, within a week. During his residence In Maitland, he was managing solicitor in the office of the late Mr. R. A. Young solicitor. He took a keen interest In amateur operatic and dramatic societies, and wrote fair verse. On leaving Maitland, he went into journalism in South Africa, and had some thrilling experiences during the Boer War. He appeared to be prospering in Natal up to a few months ago, when he left for New South Wales, evidently with a hope of making another start, but trouble followed him, and a pitiful death closed what should have been a [fine?] career.

(Ref: 1908 ‘THE LATE MR. W. A. SQUIRE.’, Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners’ Advocate (NSW : 1876 – 1954), 25 January, p. 6. , viewed 21 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article138393809 )

 

1908, January 26.

JOURNALIST’S SAD END.

The body of a man found dead on Thursday in tho A.A. Company’s paddock, Newcastle, with a revolver grasped in the hand, was Identified as that of William A. Squire, who returned here at Christmas time from South Africa, where he was under fire during the Boer war, and acted as war correspondent to several Northern newspapers. Since the war Squire had been engaged in journalistic work in South Africa. On the body was found the following letter:

“I cannot write to Rita” (meaning his daughter). “This will break her heart. I ask Will Arnott to Instruct her and strengthen her further in Christian religion. I killed myself. In Natal I cannot face my innocent wife and children. Mother, Nan, Rita, and Viva, all, forgive all my evil ; remember only my good. Forgive me all. — Will.”

Squire’s wife is at present on her way out from England. An inquest was opened yesterday and adjourned.

Mr. Squire had a stirring career. Since his return to Sydney he did casual journalistic work as a contributor. About a fortnight ago he penned the lines appearing below, and which, in the light of his sad ending, are pathotic Indeed. He was in the “Sunday Times” office a few days ago, apparently cheerful, and stated that he was going to Newcastle, where he had been fixed up with a good billet. There was nothing in his manner to indicate that the verses which we reprint, and which appeared in “The Arrow” on Saturday week, were more than a journalistic fantasy sketch. Now, it seems, they were a realistic mind picture. The verse was signed “I. D. Clare”:

“DONE IN !

“I was looking at a donah down at Coogee with her boy,
With skittish, kitten foolishness canoodling on the seat,
Their faces wreathed with happiness that knoweth not alloy;
I was dead beat.

“The band was playing bonser tunes, the figure eight was gay
With shouts of giddy laughter and gurgles of content ;
I strolled along the sea-wall In a dull, distracted way.
Without a cent.

“It was merry for the people as they walked along the street ;
Their zest in life was earnest, their joy in life was keen ;
And I was looking down upon the sand ‘done in,’ ‘dead beat,’
Without a bean.

“My wants are few and simple, ’tis there I have the pull
On the affluent and wealthy, who are wasteful, I’ll confess ;
But what’s a man to squander with his trouser-pockets full
Of nothingness ?

“Time was when at the theatre I’d tie me to the stalls,
Or loll In gaudy splendor in a crimson cushioned box !
But a horse-box now may shield me when ever shadow falls,
I’m on the rocks.

“Old Fate is growling at me, as I gaze in sundry bars,
And I think of devious corkscrew ways and a whisky-laden head.
Still I borrow some tobacco and I thank my lucky stars.
I might be dead !”

Ref: 1908 ‘JOURNALIST’S SAD END.’, Sunday Times (Sydney, NSW : 1895 – 1930), 26 January, p. 11. , viewed 20 Jun 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126727788

 

1908, January 28. (Tuesday) Wagga Wagga Advertiser p. 4 (http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145100678)

The body of a man found dead in the A. A. Company’s paddock. Newcastle with a revolver grasped in the hand, was identified as that of Wm. A. Squire, who returned here at Christmas time from South Africa, where he was under fire during the Boer war, and acted as war correspondent to several northern papers. Since the war Squire has been engaged in journalistic work in South Africa. On the body was found the following letter:— “I cannot write to Rita” (meaning his daughter). “This will break her heart. I ask Will Arnott to instruct her and strengthen her further in Christian religion. I killed myself. In Natal I cannot face my innocent wife and children. Mother, Nan, Rita, and Viva, all, forgive all my evil; remember only my good. Forgive me all. – Will.” Squire’s wife is at present on her way out from England. (Ref: 1908 ‘Advertising’, Wagga Wagga Advertiser (NSW : 1875 – 1910), 28 January, p. 4. , viewed 21 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article145100678 )

 

A number of posthumous articles by Squire were subsequently published in the months following his untimely death.

 

1908, January 30. Ref: 1908 ‘INDIANS IN SOUTH AFRICA.’, Townsville Daily Bulletin (Qld. : 1907 – 1954), 30 January, p. 3. , viewed 28 May 2018,http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57927208

 

1908, February 1. W. A. squire, whose, body was found in the A.A. Company’s paddock near the beach on Wednesday afternoon, and where lie had evidently shot himself, was well known, in Maitland some years back. He was then engaged in the office of the late Mr. R. A. Young, solicitor, and was very popular. He took a keen interest in dramatics, and wielded a facile pen, together with being somewhat of a versifier. He was married to a Newcastle lady, and left for South Africa shortly before the war, many engagements; in which he described for an English paper. Later on he became manager and editor of the Natal “Mercury”, and in that position his future seemed assured, but no one can foretell what a day may bring forth, and poor Squire, being only mortal, appears to have stumbled on the way, and down he went. An inquest, concerning his death was initiated yesterday and adjourned to allow of the body being thoroughly identified, which was done during the afternoon. Ref: 1908 ‘NEWCASTLE.’, The Maitland Weekly Mercury (NSW : 1894 – 1931), 1 February, p. 14. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article126066755

 

1908, February 2. January 21. — W. A. Squire, recent-arrival from South Africa, suicided (by revolver) on Mereweather Beach, Newcastle, N.S.W. Ref: 1908 ‘JANUARY’S RECORD.’, The Sun (Kalgoorlie, WA : 1898 – 1919), 2 February, p. 12. , viewed 28 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article211344835

 

1908, February 3. The Peril in Natal. Mr. W. A. Squire writing in the Sydney “Daily Telegraph” says. Ref: 1908 ‘THE PERIL IN NATAL.’, Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 – 1954), 3 February, p. 9. , viewed 24 May 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article53136538

 

Gionni Di Gravio
University Archivist, and Chair, Hunter Living Histories
June 2018


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